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Vitamin C Deficiency and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients with an Inflammatory Bowel Disease

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Dietetics and Internal Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-355 Poznan, Poland
2
Institute of Human Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 60-479 Poznan, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2263; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082263
Received: 29 June 2020 / Revised: 22 July 2020 / Accepted: 25 July 2020 / Published: 29 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin C in Human Health and Disease)
Recent research studies have shown that vitamin C (ascorbic acid) may affect bone mineral density and that a deficiency of ascorbic acid leads to the development of osteoporosis. Patients suffering from an inflammatory bowel disease are at a risk of low bone mineral density. It is vital to notice that patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis also are at risk of vitamin C deficiency which is due to factors such as reduced consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits, i.e., the main sources of ascorbic acid. Additionally, some patients follow diets which may provide an insufficient amount of vitamin C. Moreover, serum vitamin C level also is dependent on genetic factors, such as SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 genes, encoding sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters and GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes which encode glutathione S-transferases. Furthermore, ascorbic acid may modify the composition of gut microbiota which plays a role in the pathogenesis of an inflammatory bowel disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; inflammatory bowel disease; osteoporosis; supplementation; gastrointestinal microbiota; diet; glutathione transferase vitamin C; inflammatory bowel disease; osteoporosis; supplementation; gastrointestinal microbiota; diet; glutathione transferase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ratajczak, A.E.; Szymczak-Tomczak, A.; Skrzypczak-Zielińska, M.; Rychter, A.M.; Zawada, A.; Dobrowolska, A.; Krela-Kaźmierczak, I. Vitamin C Deficiency and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients with an Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2263. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082263

AMA Style

Ratajczak AE, Szymczak-Tomczak A, Skrzypczak-Zielińska M, Rychter AM, Zawada A, Dobrowolska A, Krela-Kaźmierczak I. Vitamin C Deficiency and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients with an Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2263. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082263

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ratajczak, Alicja E., Aleksandra Szymczak-Tomczak, Marzena Skrzypczak-Zielińska, Anna M. Rychter, Agnieszka Zawada, Agnieszka Dobrowolska, and Iwona Krela-Kaźmierczak. 2020. "Vitamin C Deficiency and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients with an Inflammatory Bowel Disease" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2263. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082263

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