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Review

Connecting the Dots Between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Metabolic Syndrome: A Focus on Gut-Derived Metabolites

1
Department of Biology, University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, Kelowna, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
2
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-first authorship.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1434; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051434
Received: 21 April 2020 / Revised: 12 May 2020 / Accepted: 13 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders)
The role of the microbiome in health and disease has gained considerable attention and shed light on the etiology of complex diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Since the microorganisms inhabiting the gut can confer either protective or harmful signals, understanding the functional network between the gut microbes and the host provides a comprehensive picture of health and disease status. In IBD, disruption of the gut barrier enhances microbe infiltration into the submucosae, which enhances the probability that gut-derived metabolites are translocated from the gut to the liver and pancreas. Considering inflammation and the gut microbiome can trigger intestinal barrier dysfunction, risk factors of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance may have common roots with IBD. In this review, we focus on the overlap between IBD and MetS, and we explore the role of common metabolites in each disease in an attempt to connect a common origin, the gut microbiome and derived metabolites that affect the gut, liver and pancreas. View Full-Text
Keywords: immunometabolism; gut microbiome; microbiomics; insulin resistance; metabolism; inflammatory bowel disease immunometabolism; gut microbiome; microbiomics; insulin resistance; metabolism; inflammatory bowel disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Verdugo-Meza, A.; Ye, J.; Dadlani, H.; Ghosh, S.; Gibson, D.L. Connecting the Dots Between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Metabolic Syndrome: A Focus on Gut-Derived Metabolites. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1434. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051434

AMA Style

Verdugo-Meza A, Ye J, Dadlani H, Ghosh S, Gibson DL. Connecting the Dots Between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Metabolic Syndrome: A Focus on Gut-Derived Metabolites. Nutrients. 2020; 12(5):1434. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051434

Chicago/Turabian Style

Verdugo-Meza, Andrea; Ye, Jiayu; Dadlani, Hansika; Ghosh, Sanjoy; Gibson, Deanna L. 2020. "Connecting the Dots Between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Metabolic Syndrome: A Focus on Gut-Derived Metabolites" Nutrients 12, no. 5: 1434. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051434

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