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Open AccessCommentary

Potential Adverse Public Health Effects Afforded by the Ingestion of Dietary Lipid Oxidation Product Toxins: Significance of Fried Food Sources

Leicester School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK
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Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 974; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040974
Received: 7 October 2019 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted Nutrition in Chronic Disease)
Exposure of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-rich culinary oils (COs) to high temperature frying practices generates high concentrations of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (LOPs) via oxygen-fueled, recycling peroxidative bursts. These toxins, including aldehydes and epoxy-fatty acids, readily penetrate into fried foods and hence are available for human consumption; therefore, they may pose substantial health hazards. Although previous reports have claimed health benefits offered by the use of PUFA-laden COs for frying purposes, these may be erroneous in view of their failure to consider the negating adverse public health threats presented by food-transferable LOPs therein. When absorbed from the gastrointestinal (GI) system into the systemic circulation, such LOPs may significantly contribute to enhanced risks of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs), e.g. , cancer, along with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Herein, we provide a comprehensive rationale relating to the public health threats posed by the dietary ingestion of LOPs in fried foods. We begin with an introduction to sequential lipid peroxidation processes, describing the noxious effects of LOP toxins generated therefrom. We continue to discuss GI system interactions, the metabolism and biotransformation of primary lipid hydroperoxide LOPs and their secondary products, and the toxicological properties of these agents, prior to providing a narrative on chemically-reactive, secondary aldehydic LOPs available for human ingestion. In view of a range of previous studies focused on their deleterious health effects in animal and cellular model systems, some emphasis is placed on the physiological fate of the more prevalent and toxic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. We conclude with a description of targeted nutritional and interventional strategies, whilst highlighting the urgent and unmet clinical need for nutritional and epidemiological trials probing relationships between the incidence of NCDs, and the frequency and estimated quantities of dietary LOP intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: lipid oxidation products; lipid hydroperoxides; aldehyde toxins; frying oils; fried foods; cytogenicity/gentoxicity/mutagenicity; cancer; atherosclerosis; acrolein; cooking oil fumes; maximum human dietary intake (MHDI) lipid oxidation products; lipid hydroperoxides; aldehyde toxins; frying oils; fried foods; cytogenicity/gentoxicity/mutagenicity; cancer; atherosclerosis; acrolein; cooking oil fumes; maximum human dietary intake (MHDI)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Grootveld, M.; Percival, B.C.; Leenders, J.; Wilson, P.B. Potential Adverse Public Health Effects Afforded by the Ingestion of Dietary Lipid Oxidation Product Toxins: Significance of Fried Food Sources. Nutrients 2020, 12, 974.

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