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Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Whey Protein Supplementation on Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis and Performance Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men

1
Department of Physical Education & Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
2
Food for Health Ireland (FHI), Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
3
Medical Research Council (MRC) and Arthritis Research United Kingdom (ARUK) Centre for Musculoskeletal Aging Research and National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
4
Health Research Institute (HRI), University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Ireland, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors are co-first author.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030845
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 18 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 March 2020 / Published: 21 March 2020
Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein supplementation on myofibrillar protein synthesis (myoPS) and muscle recovery over a 7-d period of intensified resistance training (RT). Methods: In a double-blind randomised parallel group design, 16 resistance-trained men aged 18 to 35 years completed a 7-d RT protocol, consisting of three lower-body RT sessions on non-consecutive days. Participants consumed a controlled diet (146 kJ·kg−1·d−1, 1.7 g·kg−1·d−1 protein) with either a whey protein supplement or an isonitrogenous control (0.33 g·kg−1·d−1 protein). To measure myoPS, 400 ml of deuterium oxide (D2O) (70 atom %) was ingested the day prior to starting the study and m. vastus lateralis biopsies were taken before and after RT-intervention. Myofibrillar fractional synthetic rate (myoFSR) was calculated via deuterium labelling of myofibrillar-bound alanine, measured by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Pyr-IRMS). Muscle recovery parameters (i.e., countermovement jump height, isometric-squat force, muscle soreness and serum creatine kinase) were assessed daily. Results: MyoFSR PRE was 1.6 (0.2) %∙d−1 (mean (SD)). Whey protein supplementation had no effect on myoFSR (p = 0.771) or any recovery parameter (p = 0.390–0.989). Conclusions: Over an intense 7-d RT protocol, 0.33 g·kg−1·d−1 of supplemental whey protein does not enhance day-to-day measures of myoPS or postexercise recovery in resistance-trained men. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary protein; deuterium oxide; exercise performance; humans; skeletal muscle; whey protein. dietary protein; deuterium oxide; exercise performance; humans; skeletal muscle; whey protein.
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Davies, R.W.; Bass, J.J.; Carson, B.P.; Norton, C.; Kozior, M.; Wilkinson, D.J.; Brook, M.S.; Atherton, P.J.; Smith, K.; Jakeman, P.M. The Effect of Whey Protein Supplementation on Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis and Performance Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men. Nutrients 2020, 12, 845.

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