Next Article in Journal
Differences in the Prevalence of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Spanish Workers
Next Article in Special Issue
Appetitive Traits in a Population-Based Study of Polish Adolescents within the PLACE-19 Study: Validation of the Adult Eating Behavior Questionnaire
Previous Article in Journal
Beta-Cell Mass in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes, and Its Relation to Pancreas Fat: A Mini-Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Factors Influencing the Early Introduction of Sugar Sweetened Beverages among Infants: Findings from the HSHK Birth Cohort Study
Article

Home Cooking Is Related to Potential Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Adolescents: Results from the A-CHILD Study

1
Department of Global Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan
2
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Kojimachi, Tokyo 102-0083, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3845; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123845
Received: 10 November 2020 / Revised: 11 December 2020 / Accepted: 14 December 2020 / Published: 16 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating-Behavior in Children and Adolescents)
This study aimed to investigate the association between the frequency of home cooking and cardiovascular disease risk among Japanese adolescents. We used cross-sectional data on adolescents from the 2018 Adachi Child Health Impact of Living Difficulty study, which targeted junior high school students aged 13–14 years in Adachi, Tokyo, Japan. Frequency of home cooking by 553 caregivers was assessed via questionnaire and classified as high (almost daily), medium (4–5 days/week), or low (≤3 days/week). Cardiovascular disease risk factors included blood pressure, serum cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL), hemoglobin A1c, and body mass index. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that adolescents exposed to a low frequency of home cooking showed higher diastolic blood pressure (β = 3.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42 to 6.75) and lower HDL cholesterol (β = −6.15, 95% CI: −11.2 to −1.07) than those exposed to a high frequency of home cooking, adjusting for adolescents’ sex, household income, and parental comorbidity. Future studies are needed to clarify the causal relationship and mechanisms through which home cooking influences adolescents’ cardiovascular health. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; home cooking; meal preparation; blood pressure; serum cholesterol; overweight adolescents; home cooking; meal preparation; blood pressure; serum cholesterol; overweight
MDPI and ACS Style

Tani, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Isumi, A.; Doi, S. Home Cooking Is Related to Potential Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Adolescents: Results from the A-CHILD Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3845. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123845

AMA Style

Tani Y, Fujiwara T, Isumi A, Doi S. Home Cooking Is Related to Potential Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Adolescents: Results from the A-CHILD Study. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3845. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123845

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tani, Yukako, Takeo Fujiwara, Aya Isumi, and Satomi Doi. 2020. "Home Cooking Is Related to Potential Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Adolescents: Results from the A-CHILD Study" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3845. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123845

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop