Next Article in Journal
Chemical Profile, Antioxidative, and Gut Microbiota Modulatory Properties of Ganpu Tea: A Derivative of Pu-erh Tea
Next Article in Special Issue
Saliva Samples as A Tool to Study the Effect of Meal Timing on Metabolic And Inflammatory Biomarkers
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Synbiotic Supplement on Human Gut Microbiota, Body Composition and Weight Loss in Obesity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Eating Jet Lag: A Marker of the Variability in Meal Timing and Its Association with Body Mass Index
Open AccessReview

The Effect of Timing of Exercise and Eating on Postprandial Response in Adults: A Systematic Review

1
Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
2
School of Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
3
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02155, USA
4
Libraries and School of Information Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
5
Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
6
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010221
Received: 20 December 2019 / Revised: 4 January 2020 / Accepted: 10 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meal Timing to Improve Human Health)
Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern. Management of this condition has focused on behavior modification through diet and exercise interventions. A growing body of evidence has focused on temporality of dietary intake and exercise and potential effects on health. This review summarizes current literature that investigates the question “how does the timing of exercise relative to eating throughout the day effect postprandial response in adults?” Databases PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched between March–May 2019. Experimental studies conducted in healthy adults (≥18 y) and those with type 2 diabetes were included. Full texts were examined by at least two independent reviewers. Twenty studies with a total of 352 participants met the inclusion criteria. The primary finding supports that exercise performed post-meal regardless of time of day had a beneficial impact on postprandial glycemia. There was insufficient evidence regarding whether timing of exercise performed pre- vs. post-meal or vice versa in a day is related to improved postprandial glycemic response due to inherent differences between studies. Future studies focusing on the investigation of timing and occurrence of meal intake and exercise throughout the day are needed to inform whether there is, and what is, an optimal time for these behaviors regarding long-term health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: timing; exercise; dietary intake; eating; postprandial response; glycemia; type 2 diabetes; healthy; overweight; obese timing; exercise; dietary intake; eating; postprandial response; glycemia; type 2 diabetes; healthy; overweight; obese
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Aqeel, M.; Forster, A.; Richards, E.A.; Hennessy, E.; McGowan, B.; Bhadra, A.; Guo, J.; Gelfand, S.; Delp, E.; Eicher-Miller, H.A. The Effect of Timing of Exercise and Eating on Postprandial Response in Adults: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 221.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop