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Open AccessArticle

Nutritional Properties and Consumer’s Acceptance of Provitamin A-Biofortified Amahewu Combined with Bambara (Vigna Subterranea) Flour

Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
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Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071476
Received: 31 March 2019 / Revised: 10 June 2019 / Accepted: 20 June 2019 / Published: 28 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
Amahewu is a fermented non-alcoholic cereal grain beverage, popular in Southern Africa. This study evaluates the possibility of producing an acceptable provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified maize amahewu, complemented with bambara flour, to contribute towards the alleviation of protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Germinated, roasted, and raw bambara flours, were added at 30% (w/w) substitution level, separately, to either white maize or PVA-biofortified maize flour, and processed into amahewu. Wheat bran (5% w/w) was used as reference inoculum. Amahewu samples were analyzed for nutritional properties and acceptability. The protein and lysine contents of amahewu almost doubled with the inclusion of germinated bambara. Protein digestibility of amahewu samples increased by almost 45% with the inclusion of bambara. PVA-biofortified maize amahewu samples complemented with bambara were extremely liked for their color, aroma, and taste when compared with their white maize counterparts. The principal component analysis explained 96% of the variation and PVA-biofortified maize amahewu samples were differentiated from white maize amahewu samples. The taste of amahewu resulting from roasting and germination of bambara was preferred in PVA-biofortified maize amahewu, compared to white maize amahewu. We conclude that PVA-biofortified maize amahewu, complemented with germinated bambara, has the potential to contribute towards the alleviation of PEM and VAD. View Full-Text
Keywords: bambara; provitamin A-biofortified maize; amahewu; protein energy malnutrition (PEM); germination; roasting; consumer acceptability; vitamin A deficiency (VAD) bambara; provitamin A-biofortified maize; amahewu; protein energy malnutrition (PEM); germination; roasting; consumer acceptability; vitamin A deficiency (VAD)
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Awobusuyi, T.D.; Siwela, M. Nutritional Properties and Consumer’s Acceptance of Provitamin A-Biofortified Amahewu Combined with Bambara (Vigna Subterranea) Flour. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1476.

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