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Open AccessArticle

Improving the Dietary Vitamin A Content of Rural Communities in South Africa by Replacing Non-Biofortified White Maize and Sweet Potato with Biofortified Maize and Sweet Potato in Traditional Dishes

1
Dietetics and Human Nutrition, School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209, Pietermaritzburg 3201, South Africa
2
Centre for Transformative Agricultural and Food Systems, School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209, Pietermaritzburg 3201, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061198
Received: 30 March 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
Biofortification of staple crops has a potential for addressing micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin A deficiency (VAD), which are prevalent in South Africa. The poor acceptability of provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified foods could be improved by combining them with other food items to produce modified traditional dishes. The nutritional composition of the dishes could also be improved by the modification. The study aimed to investigate the effect of replacing white maize and cream-fleshed sweet potato (CFSP)] with PVA-biofortified maize and orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) on the nutritional composition of South African traditional dishes. The protein, fibre, total mineral (ash), lysine, and iron concentrations of the PVA maize phutu (traditional porridge) composite dishes (control), were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of white maize phutu composite dishes. However, the PVA concentration of PVA maize phutu composite dishes was higher than that of the white phutu composite dishes (P > 0.05). The OFSP had a significantly lower protein concentration, but a significantly higher (P > 0.05) fibre, ash, lysine, isoleucine, leucine, and PVA concentration, relative to the CFSP. The findings indicate that composite dishes in which white maize is replaced with PVA-biofortified maize, and switching over from CFSP to OFSP, would contribute to combating VAD in South Africa, and in other developing counties. View Full-Text
Keywords: food and nutrition insecurity; nutrients; provitamin A-biofortified foods; bambara groundnut; orange-fleshed sweet potato; indigenous foods food and nutrition insecurity; nutrients; provitamin A-biofortified foods; bambara groundnut; orange-fleshed sweet potato; indigenous foods
MDPI and ACS Style

Govender, L.; Pillay, K.; Siwela, M.; Modi, A.T.; Mabhaudhi, T. Improving the Dietary Vitamin A Content of Rural Communities in South Africa by Replacing Non-Biofortified White Maize and Sweet Potato with Biofortified Maize and Sweet Potato in Traditional Dishes. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1198.

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