Next Article in Journal
An Ontology to Standardize Research Output of Nutritional Epidemiology: From Paper-Based Standards to Linked Content
Next Article in Special Issue
Asymmetric and Symmetric Protein Arginine Dimethylation: Concept and Postprandial Effects of High-Fat Protein Meals in Healthy Overweight Men
Previous Article in Journal
Gastrointestinal Sensing of Meal-Related Signals in Humans, and Dysregulations in Eating-Related Disorders
Previous Article in Special Issue
Postprandial Lipemic Responses to Various Sources of Saturated and Monounsaturated Fat in Adults
Open AccessReview

Effect of Nutrient and Micronutrient Intake on Chylomicron Production and Postprandial Lipemia

by Charles Desmarchelier 1,2,3,4, Patrick Borel 1,2,3,4, Denis Lairon 1,2,3,4, Marie Maraninchi 1,2,3,4,5 and René Valéro 1,2,3,4,5,*
1
Aix-Marseille Université, Faculty of Medicine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France
2
C2VN (Center for Cardiovascular and Nutrition Research), Faculty of Medicine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France
3
INSERM, Faculty of Medicine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France
4
INRA, Faculty of Medicine, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France
5
APHM (Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille), CHU Conception, 147 Boulevard Baille, 13385 Marseille, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061299
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 8 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Diet and Nutrition on Postprandial Metabolism)
Postprandial lipemia, which is one of the main characteristics of the atherogenic dyslipidemia with fasting plasma hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and an increase of small and dense low-density lipoproteins is now considered a causal risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Postprandial lipemia, which is mainly related to the increase in chylomicron production, is frequently elevated in individuals at high cardiovascular risk such as obese or overweight patients, type 2 diabetic patients and subjects with a metabolic syndrome who share an insulin resistant state. It is now well known that chylomicron production and thus postprandial lipemia is highly regulated by many factors such as endogenous factors: circulating factors such as hormones or free fatty acids, genetic variants, circadian rhythms, or exogenous factors: food components, dietary supplements and prescription drugs. In this review, we focused on the effect of nutrients, micronutrients and phytochemicals but also on food structure on chylomicron production and postprandial lipemia. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbohydrates; cardiovascular disease; cholesterol; fibers; food structure; lipids; polyphenols; proteins; triglycerides; vitamins carbohydrates; cardiovascular disease; cholesterol; fibers; food structure; lipids; polyphenols; proteins; triglycerides; vitamins
MDPI and ACS Style

Desmarchelier, C.; Borel, P.; Lairon, D.; Maraninchi, M.; Valéro, R. Effect of Nutrient and Micronutrient Intake on Chylomicron Production and Postprandial Lipemia. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1299.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop