Next Article in Journal
Iron Deficiency and Iron Homeostasis in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Impact of Nutrition on Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) in Gynecologic Oncology
Previous Article in Special Issue
Post Meal Energy Boluses Do Not Increase the Duration of Muscle Protein Synthesis Stimulation in Two Anabolic Resistant Situations
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Postprandial Lipemic Responses to Various Sources of Saturated and Monounsaturated Fat in Adults

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
2
School of Kinesiology, Applied Health and Recreation, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1089; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051089
Received: 15 April 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Diet and Nutrition on Postprandial Metabolism)
  |  
PDF [1260 KB, uploaded 16 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Background: Postprandial lipemia (PPL) is a cardiovascular disease risk factor. However, the effects of different fat sources on PPL remain unclear. We aimed to determine the postprandial response in triglycerides (TG) to four dietary fat sources in adults. Methods: Participants completed four randomized meal trials. For each meal trial, participants (n = 10; 5M/5F) consumed a high-fat meal (HFM) (13 kcal/kg; 61% of total kcal from fat) with the fat source derived from butter, coconut oil, olive oil, or canola oil. Blood was drawn hourly for 6 h post-meal to quantify PPL. Results: Two-way ANOVA of TG revealed a time effect (p < 0.0001), but no time–meal interaction (p = 0.56), or meal effect (p = 0.35). Meal trials did not differ with regard to TG total (p = 0.33) or incremental (p = 0.14) area-under-the-curve. When stratified by sex and the TG response was averaged across meals, two-way ANOVA revealed a time effect (p < 0.0001), time–group interaction (p = 0.0001), and group effect (p = 0.048), with men exhibiting a greater response than women, although this difference could be attributed to the pronounced difference in BMI between men and women within the sample. Conclusion: In our sample of young adults, postprandial TG responses to a single HFM comprised of different fat sources did not differ. View Full-Text
Keywords: postprandial lipemia; coconut oil; butter; canola oil; olive oil; lipid; triglycerides; dietary fat; saturated fat; cardiovascular disease postprandial lipemia; coconut oil; butter; canola oil; olive oil; lipid; triglycerides; dietary fat; saturated fat; cardiovascular disease
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sciarrillo, C.M.; Koemel, N.A.; Tomko, P.M.; Bode, K.B.; Emerson, S.R. Postprandial Lipemic Responses to Various Sources of Saturated and Monounsaturated Fat in Adults. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1089.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top