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Profound Changes in Net Energy and Nitrogen Metabolites Fluxes within the Splanchnic Area during Overfeeding of Yucatan Mini Pigs That Remain Euglycemic

1
Université Clermont Auvergne, INRA, UNH, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, CRNH Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France
2
Université Clermont Auvergne, INRA, UNH, Unité de Nutrition Humaine, PFEM, Metabo-Hub Clermont, CRNH Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020434
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 5 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Diet and Nutrition on Postprandial Metabolism)
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Abstract

A dysregulation of nutrient exchange between tissues (gut, liver, muscles, adipose) occurs during overnutrition and could induce obesity and metabolic diseases. We aimed to evaluate how, in overfed mini pigs, nutrients use and partition were regulated in the gut and liver. Net nutrients fluxes were assessed in the fed (PP) and post absorptive (PA) states at 1, 14 and 60 days of adaptation to overfeeding in five adult Yucatan female multicatheterized minipigs. Pigs PA glycaemia and PP-induced hyperglycemia remained unchanged over the experimental period, suggesting that the management of the excess of energy intake allowed the maintenance of glucose levels. This was associated with (1) an increased PA plasma insulin, (2) an increased gut lactate production (increased lactate net release +89%, 1 h PP, D1 vs. D60) probably from an increased glucose oxidation, (3) a shift in utilization of gluconeogenic precursor (lactate, propionate) in the liver, and (4) a reduced gut utilization of nitrogen moieties for energy purposes (glutamine), a nitrogen sparing effect at the whole body level (decreased plasma urea in PA (−24% D1 vs. D60) and PP states) and a specific increased level of AA involved in lipids handling and bile recycling in the gut lumen (taurine and glycine). View Full-Text
Keywords: liver; gut; obesity; amino acid; glucose; lactate; nutrient flux; short chain fatty acid; minipig liver; gut; obesity; amino acid; glucose; lactate; nutrient flux; short chain fatty acid; minipig
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Savary-Auzeloux, I.; Mohamed, A.-B.; Cohade, B.; Dardevet, D.; David, J.; Hafnaoui, N.; Migné, C.; Pujos-Guillot, E.; Rémond, D.; Polakof, S. Profound Changes in Net Energy and Nitrogen Metabolites Fluxes within the Splanchnic Area during Overfeeding of Yucatan Mini Pigs That Remain Euglycemic. Nutrients 2019, 11, 434.

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