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High Protein Diet and Metabolic Plasticity in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Myths and Truths

1
Biosensors for Bioengineering Group, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Baldiri I Reixac, 10-12, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Barcelona (UB), Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 585, 08007 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2985; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122985
Received: 31 October 2019 / Revised: 27 November 2019 / Accepted: 30 November 2019 / Published: 6 December 2019
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by lipid accumulation within the liver affecting 1 in 4 people worldwide. As the new silent killer of the twenty-first century, NAFLD impacts on both the request and the availability of new liver donors. The liver is the first line of defense against endogenous and exogenous metabolites and toxins. It also retains the ability to switch between different metabolic pathways according to food type and availability. This ability becomes a disadvantage in obesogenic societies where most people choose a diet based on fats and carbohydrates while ignoring vitamins and fiber. The chronic exposure to fats and carbohydrates induces dramatic changes in the liver zonation and triggers the development of insulin resistance. Common believes on NAFLD and different diets are based either on epidemiological studies, or meta-analysis, which are not controlled evidences; in most of the cases, they are biased on test-subject type and their lifestyles. The highest success in reverting NAFLD can be attributed to diets based on high protein instead of carbohydrates. In this review, we discuss the impact of NAFLD on body metabolic plasticity. We also present a detailed analysis of the most recent studies that evaluate high-protein diets in NAFLD with a special focus on the liver and the skeletal muscle protein metabolisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: NAFLD; NASH; high protein diet; low carbohydrates; physical activity NAFLD; NASH; high protein diet; low carbohydrates; physical activity
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De Chiara, F.; Ureta Checcllo, C.; Ramón Azcón, J. High Protein Diet and Metabolic Plasticity in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Myths and Truths. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2985.

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