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Lactobacillus plantarum P2R3FA Isolated from Traditional Cereal-Based Fermented Food Increase Folate Status in Deficient Rats

1
Center for food science and nutrition, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa P.O. Box 150201, Ethiopia
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland
3
Département de Technologie Alimentaire, IRSAT, CNRST, Ouagadougou B.P. 7047, Burkina Faso
4
UMR Nutripass, IRD, University of Montpellier/Montpellier SupAgro, 34394 Montpellier, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2819; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112819
Received: 15 October 2019 / Revised: 4 November 2019 / Accepted: 12 November 2019 / Published: 18 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effects of Fermentation)
Folate deficiencies are widespread around the world. Promoting consumption of folate-rich foods could be a sustainable option to alleviate this problem. However, these foods are not always available. Cereals, being a staple food, could contribute to folate intake. They are fermented prior to consumption in many African countries, and fermentation can modify the folate content. In Ethiopia, injera is a widely consumed fermented flat bread. The main drivers of its fermentation are lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The aim of this work was to isolate and identify folate-producing LAB from injera fermented dough and to evaluate their ability to increase folate status after depletion in a rat model. Among the 162 strains isolated from 60 different fermentations, 19 were able to grow on a folate-free culture medium and produced 1 to 43 µg/L (24 h, 30 °C incubation). The four highest folate producers belonged to the Lactobacillus plantarum species. The most productive strain was able to enhance folate status after depletion in a rat model, despite the relatively low folate content of the feed supplemented with the strain. Folate-producing L. plantarum strain has potential use as a commercial starter in injera production. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioavailability; cereal; fermentation; folate; lactic acid bacteria; rats bioavailability; cereal; fermentation; folate; lactic acid bacteria; rats
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Tamene, A.; Baye, K.; Kariluoto, S.; Edelmann, M.; Bationo, F.; Leconte, N.; Humblot, C. Lactobacillus plantarum P2R3FA Isolated from Traditional Cereal-Based Fermented Food Increase Folate Status in Deficient Rats. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2819.

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