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Open AccessArticle

Association between Hydration Status and Body Composition in Healthy Adolescents from Spain

Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Universidad CEU San Pablo, 28668 Madrid, Spain
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors share senior authorship.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2692; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112692
Received: 16 October 2019 / Revised: 31 October 2019 / Accepted: 5 November 2019 / Published: 7 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from NUTRIMAD 2018)
At present, obesity and overweight are major public health concerns. Their classical determinants do not sufficiently explain the current situation and it is urgent to investigate other possible causes. In recent years, it has been suggested that water intake could have important implications for weight management. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of hydration status on body weight and composition in healthy adolescents from Spain. The study involved 372 subjects, aged 12–18 years. Water intake was assessed through the validated “hydration status questionnaire adolescent young”. Anthropometric measurements were performed according to the recommendations of the International Standards for Anthropometric Assessment (ISAK) and body composition was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Water intake normalized by body weight was positively correlated with body water content (boys (B): r = 0.316, p = 0.000; girls (G): r = 0.245, p = 0.000) and inversely with body mass index (BMI) (B: r = −0.515, p = 0.000; G: r = −0.385, p =0.000) and fat body mass (B: r = −0.306, p = 0.000; G: r = −0.250, p = 0.001). Moreover, according to BMI, overweight/obese individuals consumed less water than normal weight ones. In conclusion, higher water balance and intake seems to be related with a healthier body composition. View Full-Text
Keywords: water intake; water balance; weight management; obesity; overweight; body composition water intake; water balance; weight management; obesity; overweight; body composition
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Laja García, A.I.; Moráis-Moreno, C.; Samaniego-Vaesken, M.L.; Puga, A.M.; Varela-Moreiras, G.; Partearroyo, T. Association between Hydration Status and Body Composition in Healthy Adolescents from Spain. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2692.

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