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Open AccessArticle

The Timing of Activity after Eating Affects the Glycaemic Response of Healthy Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial

1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
2
Edgar National Centre for Diabetes and Obesity Research, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1743; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111743
Received: 18 October 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
There is scant information on how a time lag between the cessation of eating and commencement of physical activity affects postprandial glycaemia. Starting at baseline (t = 0), participants ingested white bread containing 50 g of available carbohydrates within 10 min. Using two crossover conditions, we tested the effect over 2 h on postprandial glycaemia of participants undertaking light activity at 15 or 45 min following baseline and compared it with a sedentary control condition. The activity involved cycling on a stationary ergometer for 10 min at 40 revolutions per min with zero resistance. Seventy-eight healthy adults were randomized to the 15 or 45 min activity arm and then randomised to the order in which they undertook the active and sedentary conditions. Cycling 45 min after baseline changed the course of the blood glucose response (likelihood ratio chi square = 31.47, p < 0.01) and reduced mean blood glucose by 0.44 mmol/L (95% confidence interval 0.14 to 0.74) at 60 min when compared with the sedentary control. No differences in postprandial blood glucose response were observed when cycling started 15 min after baseline compared with the sedentary control. Undertaking activity after waiting for 30 min following eating might be optimal in modifying the glycaemic response. View Full-Text
Keywords: postprandial; glycaemia; activity; exercise; timing postprandial; glycaemia; activity; exercise; timing
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Reynolds, A.N.; Venn, B.J. The Timing of Activity after Eating Affects the Glycaemic Response of Healthy Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1743.

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