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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle

Impacts of Land-Use Changes on Soil Erosion in Water–Wind Crisscross Erosion Region of China

1
Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, Center for Spatial Analysis, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA
2
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215011, China
3
Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
4
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(14), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141732
Received: 3 June 2019 / Revised: 20 July 2019 / Accepted: 21 July 2019 / Published: 23 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Human-Environment Interactions)
Soil erosion affects food production, biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, and climate. Land-use changes accelerated by intensive human activities are a dominant anthropogenic factor inducing soil erosion globally. However, the impacts of land-use-type changes on soil erosion dynamics over a continuous period for constructing a sustainable ecological environment has not been systematically quantified. This study investigates the spatial–temporal dynamics of land-use change and soil erosion across a specific area in China with water–wind crisscross erosion during three periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2005, and 2005–2010. We analyzed the impacts of each land-use-type conversion on the intensity changes of soil erosion caused by water and wind, respectively. The major findings include: (1) land-use change in the water–wind crisscross erosion region of China was characterized as cultivated land expansion at the main cost of grassland during 1995–2010; (2) the strongest land-use change moved westward in space from the central Loess Plateau area in 1995–2005 to the western piedmont alluvial area in 2005–2010; (3) soil erosion area is continuously increasing, but the trend is declining from the late 1990s to the late 2000s; (4) the soil conservation capability of land-use types in water–wind crisscross erosion regions could be compiled from high to low as high coverage grasslands, medium coverage grasslands, paddy, drylands, low coverage grasslands, built-up lands, unused land of sandy lands, the Gobi Desert, and bare soil. These findings could provide some insights for executing reasonable land-use approaches to balance human demands and environment sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: land use; land cover; land degradation; land management; remote sensing land use; land cover; land degradation; land management; remote sensing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z. Impacts of Land-Use Changes on Soil Erosion in Water–Wind Crisscross Erosion Region of China. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1732. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141732

AMA Style

Wang J, Zhang W, Zhang Z. Impacts of Land-Use Changes on Soil Erosion in Water–Wind Crisscross Erosion Region of China. Remote Sensing. 2019; 11(14):1732. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141732

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Jie; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Zengxiang. 2019. "Impacts of Land-Use Changes on Soil Erosion in Water–Wind Crisscross Erosion Region of China" Remote Sens. 11, no. 14: 1732. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141732

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