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Article

Wild Food Plant Gathering among Kalasha, Yidgha, Nuristani and Khowar Speakers in Chitral, NW Pakistan

1
University of Gastronomic Sciences, 12042 Pollenzo, Italy
2
Center for Plant Sciences and Biodiversity, University of Swat, Kanju 19201, Pakistan
3
Department of Medical Analysis, Tishk International University, Erbil 44001, Kurdistan, Iraq
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9176; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219176
Received: 10 October 2020 / Revised: 30 October 2020 / Accepted: 2 November 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
The documentation of local food resources among linguistic/cultural minorities is essential for fostering measures aimed at sustaining food biocultural heritage. Moreover, interdisciplinary studies on food cultural heritage represent a vital aspect of promoting environmental and social sustainability. The current study aimed to record the traditional foraging of wild food plants (WFPs) among three minority groups (Kalasha, Muslim Ismaili Yidgha, and Muslim Sunni Kamkata-vari speakers) as well as the dominant (Sunni Muslim) Kho/Chitrali people in the Kalasha and Lotkoh valleys, Chitral, NW Pakistan. A field survey recorded fifty-five locally gathered wild food plants and three mycological taxa. Most of the WFPs were used raw as snacks or as cooked vegetables, and Yidgha speakers reported the highest number of WFPs. Although the wild food plant uses of the four considered groups were quite similar, Yidgha speakers exclusively reported the use of Heracleum candicans, Matricaria chamomilla, Seriphidium brevifolium, and Sisymbrium irio. Similarly, Kalasha speakers reported the highest number of use reports, and along with Yidgha speakers they quoted a few WFPs that were frequently used only by them. The results of the study showed a remarkable degree of cultural adaptation of the minority groups to the dominant Kho/Chitrali culture, but also some signs of cultural resilience among those linguistic and religious minorities that were historically more marginalized (Kalasha and Yidgha speakers). The recorded food biocultural heritage should be seriously considered in future development programs aimed at fostering social cohesion and sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: ethnobotany; food heritage; wild food plants; TEK; Pakistan ethnobotany; food heritage; wild food plants; TEK; Pakistan
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abdul Aziz, M.; Ullah, Z.; Pieroni, A. Wild Food Plant Gathering among Kalasha, Yidgha, Nuristani and Khowar Speakers in Chitral, NW Pakistan. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9176. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219176

AMA Style

Abdul Aziz M, Ullah Z, Pieroni A. Wild Food Plant Gathering among Kalasha, Yidgha, Nuristani and Khowar Speakers in Chitral, NW Pakistan. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):9176. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219176

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abdul Aziz, Muhammad, Zahid Ullah, and Andrea Pieroni. 2020. "Wild Food Plant Gathering among Kalasha, Yidgha, Nuristani and Khowar Speakers in Chitral, NW Pakistan" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 9176. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219176

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