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Perceived Job Insecurity and Sustainable Wellbeing: Do Coping Strategies Help?

1
Department of Psychology, University Paris Nanterre, 92000 Nanterre, France
2
Department of Psychology, University of Turin, 10124 Torino, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030784
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development)
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Abstract

For workers, perceived job insecurity represents a threat and an obstacle towards achieving a decent and sustainable dimension of wellbeing at work and in life. Using the theoretical background of the psychology of sustainability and sustainable development, the aim of this study is to deepen the relation between subjective job insecurity, self-related health and life satisfaction considering the effect of personal resources, such as specific coping strategies that people may undertake facing job insecurity perceptions. The hypotheses were tested in a convenience sample of 769 employees in France. Data were collected with a self-report questionnaire and analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Science (IBM SPSS). Results showed that job insecurity was negatively related to self-reported health and life satisfaction; furthermore, problem-focused coping of the type of job, social support and training searching behaviors resulted in worsening this negative relationship. This study expanded the understanding of coping in the context of job insecurity and showed the limitations that proactive coping strategies have against job insecurity. These results encourage the debate on how far is it possible to attain sustainable wellbeing by relying on personal resources when job insecurity is experienced. View Full-Text
Keywords: job insecurity; decent work; sustainable wellbeing; coping strategies; self-related health; life satisfaction; psychology of sustainability and sustainable development job insecurity; decent work; sustainable wellbeing; coping strategies; self-related health; life satisfaction; psychology of sustainability and sustainable development
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Giunchi, M.; Vonthron, A.-M.; Ghislieri, C. Perceived Job Insecurity and Sustainable Wellbeing: Do Coping Strategies Help? Sustainability 2019, 11, 784.

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