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Article

Model-Based Evaluation of Land Management Strategies with Regard to Multiple Ecosystem Services

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Agroscope, Agroecology and Environment Division, Reckenholzstrasse 191, CH-8046 Zürich, Switzerland
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Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Hochschulstrasse 4, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland
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Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, P.O. Box 611, CH-8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
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Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
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IHE-Delft Institute for Water Education, Department of IWSG, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands
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Agroscope, Plant Production Systems, CH-1260 Nyon, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3844; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113844
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
In agroecosystem management, conflicts between various services such as food provision and nutrient regulation are common. This study examined the trade-offs between selected ecosystem services such as food provision, water quantity and quality, erosion and climate regulations in an agricultural catchment in Western Switzerland. The aim was to explore the existing land use conflicts by a shift in land use and management strategy following two stakeholder-defined scenarios based on either land sparing or land sharing concepts. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to build an agro-hydrologic model of the region, which was calibrated and validated based on daily river discharge, monthly nitrate and annual crop yield, considering uncertainties associated with land management set up and model parameterization. The results show that land sparing scenario has the highest agricultural benefit, while also the highest nitrate concentration and GHG emissions. The land sharing scenario improves water quality and climate regulation services and reduces food provision. The management changes considered in the two land use scenarios did not seem to reduce the conflict but only led to a shift in trade-offs. Water quantity and erosion regulation remain unaffected by the two scenarios. View Full-Text
Keywords: SWAT model; model parameterization; land sharing; land sparing; water quantity; water quality; greenhouse gas emissions; agriculture; multifunctionality SWAT model; model parameterization; land sharing; land sparing; water quantity; water quality; greenhouse gas emissions; agriculture; multifunctionality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zarrineh, N.; Abbaspour, K.C.; Van Griensven, A.; Jeangros, B.; Holzkämper, A. Model-Based Evaluation of Land Management Strategies with Regard to Multiple Ecosystem Services. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3844. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113844

AMA Style

Zarrineh N, Abbaspour KC, Van Griensven A, Jeangros B, Holzkämper A. Model-Based Evaluation of Land Management Strategies with Regard to Multiple Ecosystem Services. Sustainability. 2018; 10(11):3844. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113844

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zarrineh, Nina, Karim C. Abbaspour, Ann Van Griensven, Bernard Jeangros, and Annelie Holzkämper. 2018. "Model-Based Evaluation of Land Management Strategies with Regard to Multiple Ecosystem Services" Sustainability 10, no. 11: 3844. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113844

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