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Audiology Research is published by MDPI from Volume 10 Issue 2 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Audiol. Res., Volume 9, Issue 2 (August 2019) – 3 articles

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Article
Analysis of the audiological characteristics and comorbidity in patients with chronic tinnitus
Audiol. Res. 2019, 9(2), 33-37; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2019.231 - 19 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 320
Abstract
Tinnitus is defined as perception of a sound without sound stimulation. This study aims to investigate the correlation between chronic tinnitus and the most significant clinical comorbidities and pharmacological treatments. We recruited 130 consecutive outpatients with a tinnitus for least from three [...] Read more.
Tinnitus is defined as perception of a sound without sound stimulation. This study aims to investigate the correlation between chronic tinnitus and the most significant clinical comorbidities and pharmacological treatments. We recruited 130 consecutive outpatients with a tinnitus for least from three months and 100 subjects without tinnitus. All patients had a full medical and audiological evaluation and all filled in Tinnitus Handicap Inventory questionnaire and Khalfa’s Hyperacusis questionnaire. We also analyzed the qualitative variables: audiometry exam, tinnitus characteristics and psychometric questionnaires. Univariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate the associations between the presence of tinnitus and the presence of comorbidities and drug intake. The statistical analysis provided the following results in the group of patients with tinnitus. We obtained an Odds Ratio statistically significant for the following categories taken into consideration: the presence of anxiety and depression, neurological diseases, headache, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, intake of levothyroxine and proton-pump inhibitor. In this study, we tried to evaluate the audiological characteristics in the subjects affected by chronic tinnitus in order to find a possible correlation with the comorbidities and any drugs intake. We found a statistically significant correlation between tinnitus and comorbidities like anxiety, depression, TMJ disorders, dysthyroidism, headache and levothyroxine and PPI intake. Full article
Article
Computational analysis based on audioprofiles: A new possibility for patient stratification in office-based otology
Audiol. Res. 2019, 9(2), 27-32; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2019.230 - 05 Nov 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 269
Abstract
Genetic contribution to progressive hearing loss in adults is underestimated. Established machine learning-based software could offer a rapid supportive tool to stratify patients with progressive hearing loss. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of 141 adult patients presenting with hearing loss was performed. Hearing threshold [...] Read more.
Genetic contribution to progressive hearing loss in adults is underestimated. Established machine learning-based software could offer a rapid supportive tool to stratify patients with progressive hearing loss. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of 141 adult patients presenting with hearing loss was performed. Hearing threshold was measured at least twice 18 months or more apart. Based on the baseline audiogram, hearing thresholds and age were uploaded to AudioGene v4® (Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at The University of Iowa City, IA, USA) to predict the underlying genetic cause of hearing loss and the likely progression of hearing loss. The progression of hearing loss was validated by comparison with the most recent audiogram data of the patients. The most frequently predicted loci were DFNA2B, DFNA9 and DFNA2A. The frequency of loci/genes predicted by AudioGene remains consistent when using the initial or the final audiogram of the patients. In conclusion, machine learning-based software analysis of clinical data might be a useful tool to identify patients at risk for having autosomal dominant hearing loss. With this approach, patients with suspected progressive hearing loss could be subjected to close audiological followup, genetic testing and improved patient counselling. Full article
Article
Apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Where are the particles?
Audiol. Res. 2019, 9(2), 23-26; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2019.228 - 29 Aug 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 302
Abstract
The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV) is attributed to free floating particles in the anterior arm of the lateral semicircular canal – particles attached to the cupula facing the canal or particles attached to the cupula facing [...] Read more.
The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV) is attributed to free floating particles in the anterior arm of the lateral semicircular canal – particles attached to the cupula facing the canal or particles attached to the cupula facing the utricle. Zuma e Maia described a new treatment for both canalithiasis of the anterior arm of the horizontal semicircular canal (HC) and cupulolithiasis of the HC. Seventeen patients with apogeotropic HC-BPPV were enrolled and treated with Zuma’s Maneuver. During the repositioning of the particles to the utricule, we observed the direction of the nystagmus evoked in each step of this maneuver in order to know where the otoliths were probably located. Eight patients were diagnosed with canalithiasis of the anterior arm, six patients with cupulolithiasis with the particles facing the canal and three patients with cupulolithiasis with the particles facing the utricle. Our data suggest that we can assume where the otoliths are probably located by observing the pattern of the nystagmus evoked in each step of the Zuma’s Maneuver in patients with apogeotropic HC-BPPV. Full article
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