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Potential Industrial Applications and Commercialization of Microalgae in the Functional Food and Feed Industries: A Short Review

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LEPABE—Laboratory of Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
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UNICES-ISMAI—University Institute of Maia, Av. Carlos Oliveira Campos, 4475-690 Maia, Portugal
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Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(6), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17060312
Received: 24 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 25 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds Derived from Marine Microalgae)
Bioactive compounds, e.g., protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, vitamins and minerals, found in commercial form of microalgal biomass (e.g., powder, flour, liquid, oil, tablet, or capsule forms) may play important roles in functional food (e.g., dairy products, desserts, pastas, oil-derivatives, or supplements) or feed (for cattle, poultry, shellfish, and fish) with favorable outcomes upon human health, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antiviral effects, as well as prevention of gastric ulcers, constipation, anemia, diabetes, and hypertension. However, scale up remains a major challenge before commercial competitiveness is attained. Notwithstanding the odds, a few companies have already overcome market constraints, and are successfully selling extracts of microalgae as colorant, or supplement for food and feed industries. Strong scientific evidence of probiotic roles of microalgae in humans is still lacking, while scarce studies have concluded on probiotic activity in marine animals upon ingestion. Limitations in culture harvesting and shelf life extension have indeed constrained commercial viability. There are, however, scattered pieces of evidence that microalgae play prebiotic roles, owing to their richness in oligosaccharides—hardly fermented by other members of the intestinal microbiota, or digested throughout the gastrointestinal tract of humans/animals for that matter. However, consistent applications exist only in the dairy industry and aquaculture. Despite the underlying potential in formulation of functional food/feed, extensive research and development efforts are still required before microalgae at large become a commercial reality in food and feed formulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: human health; animal health; nutrition; functional food; prebiotic; probiotic human health; animal health; nutrition; functional food; prebiotic; probiotic
MDPI and ACS Style

Camacho, F.; Macedo, A.; Malcata, F. Potential Industrial Applications and Commercialization of Microalgae in the Functional Food and Feed Industries: A Short Review. Mar. Drugs 2019, 17, 312.

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