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Open AccessArticle

Incorporation of Chloramphenicol Loaded Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles into Polylactide

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Chemical Engineering Department, Escola d’Enginyeria de Barcelona Est-EEBE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Eduard Maristany 10-14, Ed I-2, 08019 Barcelona, Spain
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Barcelona Research Center for Multiscale Science and Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Eduard Maristany 10-14, 08019 Barcelona, Spain
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B.Braun Surgical, S.A., Carretera de Terrassa 121, 08191 Rubí (Barcelona), Spain
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5056; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205056
Received: 7 September 2019 / Revised: 2 October 2019 / Accepted: 10 October 2019 / Published: 11 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Responsive Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy)
Chloramphenicol (CAM) has been encapsulated into hydroxyapatite nanoparticles displaying different morphologies and crystallinities. The process was based on typical precipitation of solutions containing phosphate and calcium ions and the addition of CAM once the hydroxyapatite nuclei were formed. This procedure favored a disposition of the drug into the bulk parts of the nanoparticles and led to a fast release in aqueous media. Clear antibacterial activity was derived, being slightly higher for the amorphous samples due to their higher encapsulation efficiency. Polylactide (PLA) microfibers incorporating CAM encapsulated in hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were prepared by the electrospinning technique and under optimized conditions. Drug release experiments demonstrated that only a small percentage of the loaded CAM could be delivered to an aqueous PBS medium. This amount was enough to render an immediate bacteriostatic effect without causing a cytotoxic effect on osteoblast-like, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prepared scaffolds were able to retain CAM-loaded nanoparticles, being a reservoir that should allow a prolonged release depending on the polymer degradation rate. The studied system may have promising applications for the treatment of cancer since CAM has been proposed as a new antitumor drug. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydroxyapatite; chloramphenicol; polylactide; electrospun scaffolds; drug encapsulation; drug release hydroxyapatite; chloramphenicol; polylactide; electrospun scaffolds; drug encapsulation; drug release
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rivas, M.; Pelechà, M.; Franco, L.; Turon, P.; Alemán, C.; del Valle, L.J.; Puiggalí, J. Incorporation of Chloramphenicol Loaded Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles into Polylactide. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 5056.

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