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Open AccessArticle

Physicochemical Changes of Air-Dried and Salt-Processed Ulva rigida over Storage Time

1
QOPNA & LAQV-REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2
ALGAplus, Produção e Comercialização de Algas e seus Derivados, Lda., 3830-196 Ílhavo, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mingfu Wang and Yueliang Zhao
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 2955; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24162955
Received: 24 June 2019 / Revised: 26 July 2019 / Accepted: 8 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products Used as Foods and Food Ingredients)
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Abstract

The impact of air-drying at 25 °C, brining at 25%, and dry-salting (at 28% and 40%) on the quality and nutritional parameters of Ulva rigida were evaluated over six months of storage. Overall, the main changes occurred in physical aspects during storage time, with U. rigida intensifying its yellow/browning tones, which were more evident in salt-treated samples. The force necessary to fracture the seaweed also increased under all the preservative conditions in the first month. Conversely, the nutritional parameters of U. rigida remained stable during the 180 days of storage. All processed samples showed a high content of insoluble and soluble fibers, overall accounting for 55%–57% dw, and of proteins (17.5%–19.2% dw), together with significant amounts of Fe (86–92 mg/kg dw). The total fatty acids pool only accounted for 3.9%–4.3% dw, but it was rich in unsaturated fatty acids (44%–49% total fatty acids), namely palmitoleic (C16:1), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), linolenic (C18:3), and stearidonic (18:4) acids, with an overall omega 6/omega 3 ratio below 0.6, a fact that highlights their potential health-promoting properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ulva sp.; sea lettuce; color; texture; minerals; fatty acids; nutritional; brining; dry-salting; air-drying Ulva sp.; sea lettuce; color; texture; minerals; fatty acids; nutritional; brining; dry-salting; air-drying
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Pinheiro, V.F.; Marçal, C.; Abreu, H.; Lopes da Silva, J.A.; Silva, A.M.S.; Cardoso, S.M. Physicochemical Changes of Air-Dried and Salt-Processed Ulva rigida over Storage Time. Molecules 2019, 24, 2955.

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