Topic Editors

Prof. Dr. Patrick Honore
Full Head of ICU Dept, CHU UCL Godinne Namur, UCL Louvain Medical School, 5533 Yvoir, Belgium
Prof. Dr. Isabelle Michaux
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, CHU UCL Namur, Université Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)

Abstract submission deadline
30 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 November 2024
Viewed by
1603

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decades, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to describe the use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support in the ICU. Over the years the use of ECMO has expanded from neonates to adults and consists of pulmonary, cardiac, or combined support. Initially ECMO was applied when patients were on maximal conventional support and were considered to be moribund. The initial results in the neonatal population showed a mortality reduction from the predicted greater than 90% risk of mortality to a greater than 50% survival rate. In 1989 the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) was voluntarily formed to pool data and knowledge from all active ECMO centers.

Our Topic, together with the journals (Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease, Journal of Clinical Medicine, Medicina, Membranes, Advances in Respiratory Medicine) provide a platform for researchers around the globe to share the novel and cutting-edge works about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: extracorporeal CO2 removal, extracorporeal life support, membrane biocompatibility, ECMO transportation, anticoagulation strategies, membrane imaging. Authors are invited to submit their latest results: original research papers, reviews (narrative, systematic), or case reports are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Patrick Honore
Prof. Dr. Isabelle Michaux
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)
  • extracorporeal CO2 removal
  • extracorporeal life support
  • membrane biocompatibility
  • anticoagulation strategies
  • ECMO transportation

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease
jcdd
2.4 2.4 2014 20.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Medicina
medicina
2.6 3.6 1920 19.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Membranes
membranes
4.2 4.4 2011 13.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Advances in Respiratory Medicine
arm
1.8 2.0 1909 25.9 Days CHF 1300 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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11 pages, 2945 KiB  
Article
Has Extracorporeal Gas Exchange Performance Reached Its Peak?
by Foivos Leonidas Mouzakis, Ali Kashefi, Flutura Hima, Khosrow Mottaghy and Jan Spillner
Membranes 2024, 14(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes14030068 - 17 Mar 2024
Viewed by 651
Abstract
Extracorporeal gas exchange therapies evolved considerably within the first three–four decades of their appearance, and have since reached a mature stage, where minor alterations and discrete fine-tuning might offer some incremental improvement. A different approach is introduced here, making use of modern, purely [...] Read more.
Extracorporeal gas exchange therapies evolved considerably within the first three–four decades of their appearance, and have since reached a mature stage, where minor alterations and discrete fine-tuning might offer some incremental improvement. A different approach is introduced here, making use of modern, purely diffusive membrane materials, and taking advantage of the elevated concentration gradient ensuing from gas pressure buildup in the gas chamber of the oxygenator. An assortment of silicone membrane gas exchangers were tested in vitro as per a modified protocol in pursuance of assessing their gas exchange efficiency under both regular and high-pressure aeration conditions. The findings point to a stark performance gain when pressurization of the gas compartment is involved; a 40% rise above atmospheric pressure elevates oxygen transfer rate (OTR) by nearly 30%. Carbon dioxide transfer rate (CTR) does not benefit as much from this principle, yet it retains a competitive edge when higher gas flow/blood flow ratios are employed. Moreover, implementation of purely diffusive membranes warrants a bubble-free circulation. Further optimization of the introduced method ought to pave the way for in vivo animal trials, which in turn may potentially unveil new realms of gas exchange performance for therapies associated with extracorporeal circulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO))
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11 pages, 1271 KiB  
Article
Severe Lung Dysfunction and Pulmonary Blood Flow during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
by Lars Falk, Marika Lidegran, Sandra Diaz Ruiz, Jan Hultman and Lars Mikael Broman
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(4), 1113; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13041113 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 433
Abstract
Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is indicated for patients with severe respiratory and/or circulatory failure. The standard technique to visualize the extent of pulmonary damage during ECMO is computed tomography (CT). Purpose: This single-center, retrospective study investigated whether pulmonary blood flow (PBF) measured [...] Read more.
Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is indicated for patients with severe respiratory and/or circulatory failure. The standard technique to visualize the extent of pulmonary damage during ECMO is computed tomography (CT). Purpose: This single-center, retrospective study investigated whether pulmonary blood flow (PBF) measured with echocardiography can assist in assessing the extent of pulmonary damage and whether echocardiography and CT findings are associated with patient outcomes. Methods: All patients (>15 years) commenced on ECMO between 2011 and 2017 with septic shock of pulmonary origin and a treatment time >28 days were screened. Of 277 eligible patients, 9 were identified where both CT and echocardiography had been consecutively performed. Results: CT failed to indicate any differences in viable lung parenchyma within or between survivors and non-survivors at any time during ECMO treatment. Upon initiation of ECMO, the survivors (n = 5) and non-survivors (n = 4) had similar PBF. During a full course of ECMO support, survivors showed no change in PBF (3.8 ± 2.1 at ECMO start vs. 7.9 ± 4.3 L/min, p = 0.12), whereas non-survivors significantly deteriorated in PBF from 3.5 ± 1.0 to 1.0 ± 1.1 L/min (p = 0.029). Tidal volumes were significantly lower over time among the non-survivors, p = 0.047. Conclusions: In prolonged ECMO for pulmonary septic shock, CT was not found to be effective for the evaluation of pulmonary viability or recovery. This hypothesis-generating investigation supports echocardiography as a tool to predict pulmonary recovery via the assessment of PBF at the early to later stages of ECMO support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO))
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