Special Issue "Advances in Work-Related Stress Prevention and Management"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rosanna Cousins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool L16 9JD, UK
Interests: occupational health promotion; work-related stress; health & safety; risk assessment; work ability; job satisfaction; workplace wellbeing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Policies and practices that promote healthy work are a benefit to everyone. It is, however, now more than 20 years since Levy, Sauter, and Shimomitsu (1999) published a paper entitled “Work-related stress—it’s time to act”. Various theories and models that sought to explain work-related stress and its causes had already been proposed, there was evidence that exposure to workplace stressors threatened individual psychological and physical health, and a business case for action through the accumulating evidence of the substantial economic cost to organizations and society of occupational stress existed. After 20 years, psychosocial hazards at work remain a significant problem and a global concern. There is international agreement that occupational stressors must be better managed to benefit workers, organizations, and society.

Whilst there is consensus that a proactive population approach is required to prevent or at least ameliorate the effects of stressors and that reactive approaches do not meet normal duty-of-care expectations on employers, successful intervention is difficult. There have been various positive initiatives to help employers tackle work-related stress, such as the development of Management Standards in the UK (Cousins et al 2004). What else is being done to tackle work-related stress? What evidence is there to influence the design of work in the 2020s to minimize workers’ distress whilst not compromising efficiency and productivity?

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on advancing current knowledge and interventions towards minimizing work-related stress. New research papers, reviews, and case reports are welcome. Papers dealing with new approaches to stress risk assessment and management are also welcome. Other manuscript types accepted include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries.

Dr. Rosanna Cousins
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Occupational stress
  • Psychosocial hazards
  • Health and Safety
  • Proactive approaches
  • Interventions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Brief Report
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Journalists Repeatedly Covering COVID-19 News
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168536 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 851
Abstract
The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in many journalists repeatedly covering stories related to human suffering. This study investigates whether these journalists experienced higher rates of psychological distress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms than those who have been working during the pandemic [...] Read more.
The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in many journalists repeatedly covering stories related to human suffering. This study investigates whether these journalists experienced higher rates of psychological distress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms than those who have been working during the pandemic yet covering stories other than COVID-19 and aims to identify what factors may protect journalists from developing trauma-related symptoms. We assessed journalists (n = 120) working during the COVID-19 pandemic using self-report measures. Journalists repeatedly covering COVID-19 stories had significantly higher psychological distress (η2 = 0.04) and PTSD symptoms (η2 = 0.08), but not depression, compared to journalists who did not report on COVID-19. Rumination and numbing in response to unwanted memories predicted PTSD symptoms (R2 = 0.53) and may be risk factors for PTSD in this population. Unhelpful resilience appraisals distinguished journalists who reported on COVID-19 and who developed distressing re-experiencing symptoms from those who similarly reported on distressing material and who did not develop symptoms. Targeting resilience appraisals may be helpful in reducing re-experiencing symptoms after trauma exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Work-Related Stress Prevention and Management)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: PTSD Symptoms Among Journalists Repeatedly Covering COVID-19 News
Authors: Gabriella Tyson; Jennifer Wild
Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1TW, UK
Abstract: The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in many journalists repeatedly covering stories related to human suffering. This study investigates whether these journalists experience higher rates of psychological distress, PTSD and depressive symptoms than journalists who have been working during the pandemic yet covering stories other than COVID and aims to identify what factors may protect journalists from developing trauma-related symptoms. We assessed journalists (N=120) working during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journalists repeatedly covering COVID stories had significantly higher psychological distress (η2 = 0.04) and PTSD symptoms (η2 =0.08), but not depression, compared to journalists who did not report on COVID. Rumination and numbing in response to unwanted memories predicted PTSD symptoms (R²=0.53) and may be risk factors for PTSD in this population. Resilience appraisals predicted whether journalists who reported on COVID-19 developed distressing re-experiencing symptoms. Targeting resilience appraisals may reduce re-experiencing symptoms after trauma exposure.

Title: The importance of Role Ambiguity in the management of work-related stress
Authors: Rosanna Cousins
Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool L16 9JD, UK

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