Radionuclides and Metals in Coastal Area: Geochemistry, Environmental Processes and Anthropogenic Influence

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2023) | Viewed by 3273

Special Issue Editors

Laboratory for Low-Level Radioactivities, Division of Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: environmental radioactivity; gamma-emitters; radionuclides and metals in various environmental compartments; sedimentation processes; anthropogenic influence on environment; quality in laboratory; laboratory accreditation; organisation of work processes
Laboratory for Low-Level Radioactivities, Division of Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: isotope techniques; 14C; 3H; radiocarbon dating; biogenic fuels; environmental monitoring; anthropogenic influence on environment; interaction of low-energy radiation and gasses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal areas are specific, transitional areas between land and sea, and they are therefore intensely exposed to both terrestrial and aquatic influences. These areas are of great importance for both environmental processes and human activities since various and complex land–sea–human interactions occur. Their importance and vulnerability are even greater when it is considered that coastal areas are very often densely populated and that they support various commercial activities. All natural and anthropogenic influences and (bio)geochemical interactions are reflected in environmental compartments such as rocks, soils, sediments, water, biota and air. They all include radionuclides and metals, which are in the focus of this Special Issue. Their interactions and behaviour in coastal areas will reflect processes and conditions influencing them, both natural and anthropogenic.

The scope of this Special Issue is wide, and encompasses the distribution, relationships and behaviour of metals and radionuclides in various environmental compartments or different environmental matrices, their sources, interactions between metals and/or radionuclides and their interactions with other environmental parameters. Another scope is related to environmental processes involving metals and radionuclides and to the almost omnipresent anthropogenic influence. Different approaches to this topic are encouraged (e.g., statistical, modelling, experimental). The purpose of this Special Issue is to comprehensively present the current research related to metals and radionuclides in coastal areas, to obtain new insight into their geochemical behaviour and the processes involved and to collect information on the state of coastal areas under (possible) anthropogenic influence.

Dr. Ivanka Lovrenčić Mikelić
Dr. Ines Krajcar Bronić
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • geochemical behaviour
  • radioactivity
  • water-sediment interactions
  • soils
  • marine water
  • marine sediment
  • marine biota
  • environmental mobility
  • contamination/pollution
  • sedimentation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 4775 KiB  
Article
Redox Changes during the Past 100 ka in the Deeper Eastern Arabian Sea: A Study Based on Trace Elements and Multivariate Statistical Analysis
Water 2023, 15(7), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071252 - 23 Mar 2023
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Abstract
The temporal distribution of trace elements in a sediment core (SK117/GC-08) indicates minor changes in oxygenation during the last 100 kilo years in the bottom waters of the deeper eastern Arabian Sea. The high values of Mn, Co, Cu, Mn/Al, Co/Al, Cu/Al, V/Cr, [...] Read more.
The temporal distribution of trace elements in a sediment core (SK117/GC-08) indicates minor changes in oxygenation during the last 100 kilo years in the bottom waters of the deeper eastern Arabian Sea. The high values of Mn, Co, Cu, Mn/Al, Co/Al, Cu/Al, V/Cr, and V/(V + Ni) in the sediments during interglacials and interstitials collectively indicate oxic conditions during warm periods. The high values of Cr, Ni, V, Mo, Cr/Al, Ni/Al, and Ni/Co in sediments during glacials and stadials collectively indicate dysoxic to suboxic conditions during the colder last glacial maximum and during the entire marine isotope stage two. The bottom waters have never experienced anoxic conditions. Multivariate statistics showed the attribution of the trace elements in two factors: cluster 1 (Co, Cu, Mn) was enriched during oxic conditions and cluster 2 (Cr, Mo, Ni, V) was enriched during dysoxic to suboxic conditions. Oxygenation conditions are mainly driven by variations in monsoon-controlled surface water productivity and changes in the flux of circumpolar deep water. The dysoxic to suboxic bottom water conditions developed at the core location during colder climates are very well synchronised with an increased organic matter flux. The main factor that controls the accumulation of the organic-rich sediments in the eastern Arabian Sea during a glacial is the increase in the supply of organic matter from increased primary productivity in the surface waters, controlled by winter monsoon winds, and localized convective mixing. During warmer interglacials and interstadials, the core location has remained well ventilated. Full article
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26 pages, 6323 KiB  
Article
137Cs Sediment Profiles as a Tracer of Marine Sedimentation Processes in a Semi-Enclosed Bay Affected by Anthropogenic Releases—Example of Kaštela Bay (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)
Water 2022, 14(17), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14172655 - 28 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1405
Abstract
Kaštela Bay was taken as a model to study sedimentation processes using the vertical sediment profiles of 137Cs massic activities. The aim was to distinguish the sedimentation conditions in different parts of the Bay and to partly determine the pathways of terrigenous [...] Read more.
Kaštela Bay was taken as a model to study sedimentation processes using the vertical sediment profiles of 137Cs massic activities. The aim was to distinguish the sedimentation conditions in different parts of the Bay and to partly determine the pathways of terrigenous input into the Bay. The purpose was to demonstrate that 137Cs profiles are applicable in differentiating sedimentation processes. It was found that mostly continuous, undisturbed sedimentation takes place in the central and south parts of the Bay; the sedimentation conditions in the west part of the Bay are more complicated. The west part is characterised by the extremely slow sedimentation of the coarse-grained sediment or even by erosion and selective resuspension of the fine-grained particles followed by resedimentation in other parts of the Bay. It was also observed that the upper 10 cm of the sediment is the most exposed to homogenisation. The strong influence of the Jadro River and anthropogenic activities in the east part of the Bay are reflected in the higher 137Cs activities, strong sediment mixing, and increased sediment input. This study shows that the 137Cs profiles can provide comprehensive insights for the whole study region when a sophisticated sampling layout is deployed. The results of the study are applicable to other aquatic environments with comparable processes and sedimentary environments. Full article
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