Special Issue "Pathogens of Zoonotic Importance in the Aquatic Environment: Implications for Environmental and Human Health"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and One Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 1674

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Elsa T. Rodrigues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Functional Ecology - Science for People & the Planet, University of Coimbra (CFE-UC), 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: cell-based assays; mitochondrial toxicity assessment; environmental safety; food safety; environmentally relevant hazardous substances; risk characterization; aquatic ecotoxicology

Special Issue Information

Human pathogen transmission in aquatic bird populations, as well as its occurrence in bivalve molluscs and other edible aquatic species, might arise in the presence of contaminated water and sediments. The accelerating antimicrobial resistance by the current overuse of disinfectant solutions in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic may also represent new environmental threats. Thus, by recognizing, through the “One Health” approach, that the health of people is closely connected to the health of animals and our shared environment, this Special Issue aims to comprehensively evaluate the influence of the aquatic environment on the spread of human pathogens, and contribute to the human risk assessment process regarding the presence of these microorganisms in edible aquatic species.

Special issue invitation:

Dear Colleagues,

The aquatic environment can serve as a reservoir of human pathogens and as a vector of human diseases, but a general lack of knowledge about how the environmental lifestyle of zoonotic pathogens allows them to occur, persist and replicate to posteriorly be transmitted to human hosts and cause disease remains largely unknown. The influence of the Covid-19 pandemic by the overuse of disinfectant solutions on the global threat of antimicrobial resistant bacteria is also a cause of concern, since antimicrobials are a main pillar of medical applications. Due to bivalve molluscs’ natural filter feeding behaviour, the risk of accumulation of human pathogens present in the aquatic environment is also a reality, and this risk is enhanced by the fact that these shellfish are often eaten raw (e.g., oysters) or relatively lightly cooked (e.g., clams, cockles). Additionally, aquatic birds might carry emerging zoonotic pathogens, and could therefore act as long-distance disperser agents. This Special Issue, supporting the “One Health” approach which recognizes that the health of people is closely connected to the health of animals and our shared environment, aims to enhance knowledge of the occurrence and persistence of zoonotic pathogens and their known strains in different aquatic matrices (e.g., wastewater, sludge, sediment, aquatic animal faeces), as well as in aquatic animals of economic interest as bivalve molluscs and fish, since they are recreationally harvested worldwide. Detailed advanced knowledge is, thus, fundamental to the understanding of zoonotic pathogen trends in nature and to the clarification of the possible role of the environment in the spread of these microorganisms, providing essential information so as to prevent possible new epidemics and support public health actions. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Elsa T. Rodrigues
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental microbiology
  • environmental reservoir
  • aquatic environment
  • waterborne zoonotic pathogens
  • multidrug-resistant pathogens
  • food safety
  • wastewater
  • biofilms
  • sediments
  • aquatic birds

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Could Fish Feeding Behaviour and Size Explain Prevalence Differences of the Nematode Eustrongylides excisus among Species? The Case Study of Lake Garda
Water 2021, 13(24), 3581; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243581 - 14 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
The nematode Eustrongylides excisus is a parasite of freshwater fish- and fish-eating birds, with known differences on prevalence values among fish species. Thus, the present study aims to explore the hypothesis that the feeding behavior and the size of fish belonging to different [...] Read more.
The nematode Eustrongylides excisus is a parasite of freshwater fish- and fish-eating birds, with known differences on prevalence values among fish species. Thus, the present study aims to explore the hypothesis that the feeding behavior and the size of fish belonging to different trophic levels could explain such differences. For that, 14 sampling sites were selected to perform a fish parasitological survey on Lake Garda (Italy) during spring-summer 2020. Amplification of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequences of nematodes morphologically ascribable to the genus Eustrongylides allowed to identify them as E. excisus. From the five studied fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Lepomis gibbous, Coregonus lavaretus, Alosa fallax lacustris and Micropterus salmoides), only three presented the parasite E. excisus: P. fluviatilis, L. gibbous and M. salmoides, with significant differences in prevalence values among species (p = 0.002). Additionally, there were differences in prevalence values within the same fish species captured from different sampling sites. Findings showed that mainly piscivorous fish were positive for E. excisus and how the prevalence was highest in M. salmoides. As regard the fish size, a negative correlation between body size and E. excisus was found in P. fluviatilis due to the feeding habit of juvenile perch which feed mainly zooplankton and benthic invertebrates (i.e., oligochaetes, which are the first intermediate hosts of E. excisus). The study findings advance novel knowledge in the field of pathogens of zoonotic importance in the aquatic environment. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop