Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 4826

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes (LOMC), UMR 6294 CNRS, Normandie University, UNILEHAVRE, 76600 Le Havre, France
Interests: coastal hydrodynamics; sediment transport; bedload transport; suspension transport; water waves

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Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Morphodynamique Continentale et Côtière, CNRS, UMR 6143 (M2C) Normandie Université, UNICAEN, UNIROUEN, 14000 Caen, France
Interests: coastal hydrodynamics; sediment transport; hydrodynamics instabilities; water waves; extreme events

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The theme of this Special Issue is “Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone”. This is a topical issue, particularly in the context of climate change, due to the rise in sea level and its effects on the coastal zone.

This Special Issue mainly focuses on coastal hydrodynamics, sediment transport, extreme events in the coastal zone, harbour siltation, scouring in the vicinity of coastal structures, and coastal flooding. Water waves, coastal currents, combined flows, and tsunamis propagating towards the shore are subjects, among others, in which our knowledge is still limited and needs to progress. Sediment transport may have a significant impact on the coastal zone, such as through coastal erosion or the natural filling of channels and estuaries. Harbour siltation may induce drastic consequences for human activities. Coastal structures may be subject to erosion, which may result in the ruin of these structures. Extreme events in the coastal zone and coastal flooding may lead to dramatic human and material consequences. A significant part of the world population lives in the vicinity of coasts, and it is crucial to understand the physical processes operating in this zone.

This Special Issue is dedicated to providing original research findings and review articles to the whole scientific community interested in hydrodynamics and sediment transport in the coastal zone. Contributions involving field data, physical modelling, numerical modelling, or theoretical approaches are welcomed. 

Prof. Dr. Francois Marin
Dr. Nizar Abcha
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • coastal hydrodynamics
  • sediment transport
  • extreme events
  • coastal flooding
  • scour
  • burial
  • harbour siltation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 8206 KiB  
Article
A Multi-Approach Analysis for Monitoring Wave Energy Driven by Coastal Extremes
by Reine Matar, Nizar Abcha, Iskander Abroug, Nicolas Lecoq and Emma-Imen Turki
Water 2024, 16(8), 1145; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081145 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 797
Abstract
This research investigates the behavior and frequency evolution of extreme waves in coastal areas through a combination of physical modeling, spectral analysis, and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. Laboratory experiments were conducted in a wave flume, deploying various wave spectra, including JONSWAP (γ = [...] Read more.
This research investigates the behavior and frequency evolution of extreme waves in coastal areas through a combination of physical modeling, spectral analysis, and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. Laboratory experiments were conducted in a wave flume, deploying various wave spectra, including JONSWAP (γ = 7), JONSWAP (γ = 3.3), and Pierson–Moskowitz, using the dispersive focusing technique, covering a broad range of wave amplitudes. Wave characteristics were monitored using fifty-one gauges at distances between 4 m and 14 m from the wave generator, employing power spectral density (PSD) analysis to investigate wave energy subtleties. A spectral approach of discrete wavelets identified frequency components. The energy of the dominant frequency components, d5 and d4, representing the peak frequency (fp = 0.75 Hz) and its first harmonic (2fp = 1.5 Hz), respectively, exhibited a significant decrease in energy, while others increased, revealing potential correlations with zones of higher energy dissipation. This study underscores the repeatable and precise nature of results, demonstrating the Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) machine learning algorithm’s accuracy in predicting the energy of frequency components. The finding emphasizes the importance of a multi-approach analysis for effectively monitoring energy in extreme coastal waves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone)
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29 pages, 31346 KiB  
Article
Monitoring Sediment Transport in Certain Harbor Launches in the Southeastern Black Sea
by Servet Karasu, Hasan Oğulcan Marangoz, Barbaros Hayrettin Kocapir, Enver Yilmaz, İsmail Hakkı Özölçer and Adem Akpinar
Water 2023, 15(21), 3860; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213860 - 6 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The problem of shoaling on coastal structures is the result of an event that occurs as part of the natural cycle. In cases where shoaling cannot be detected or prevented, various economic and operational problems may arise and may cause disruptions. In this [...] Read more.
The problem of shoaling on coastal structures is the result of an event that occurs as part of the natural cycle. In cases where shoaling cannot be detected or prevented, various economic and operational problems may arise and may cause disruptions. In this study, the complex coastal dynamic impact of shoaling on three sequential fishery coastal structures located within the borders of Rize province in the Eastern Black Sea region of Türkiye was examined in terms of bathymetric changes and sediment transport under the influence of the incident wave climate. The effects of these structures on each other were also investigated. With this aim, bathymetric measurements were carried out to examine the impact of waves on seabed erosion and deposition. A serious shoaling problem was identified at one of the harbor launches under investigation, where approximately 13,200 m3 of deposition occurs annually in a relatively small harbor launch area. Such physical problems are thought to be the result of shoaling, the selection of sites that are not viable for fishery-related coastal structures, or the wrong positioning of the breakwater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone)
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23 pages, 9852 KiB  
Article
A Study on the Characteristics of Beach Profile Evolution According to the Particle Size Variation of Beach Nourishment
by Kyu-Tae Shim and Kyu-Han Kim
Water 2023, 15(16), 2956; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15162956 - 16 Aug 2023
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Abstract
This study investigated the beach nourishment effect and topographical changes when using nourishment sand with relatively large particle diameters to perform beach nourishment on a beach subject to erosion. A physical model test was conducted in a 2D wave flume with an installed [...] Read more.
This study investigated the beach nourishment effect and topographical changes when using nourishment sand with relatively large particle diameters to perform beach nourishment on a beach subject to erosion. A physical model test was conducted in a 2D wave flume with an installed wind tunnel. The experiment examined the sediment transport mechanism under conditions with wind and waves. Although applying nourishment sand with large particle diameters attenuated sediment transport, the increase in particle diameter was not always proportional to the reduction in topographical changes. Increasing the particle diameter of the nourishment sand increased the friction force between particles, resulting in large-scale erosion and accretion around the coastline, and this trend increased with winds. Also, with wind, the wave run-up height increased, the undertow became stronger, and large-scale scouring occurred at the boundary between the nourishment sand and the existing beach. Increasing the particle diameter of the nourishment sand played a role in reducing the run-up phenomenon (d50: 1.0 mm with 24–50%, d50: 5.0 mm with 59–83%), and the range of particles moved by winds also decreased (d50: 1.0 mm with 10–38%, d50: 5.0 mm with 5–37%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone)
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Review

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13 pages, 308 KiB  
Review
Cross-Shore Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone: A Review
by François Marin and Mélanie Vah
Water 2024, 16(7), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16070957 - 26 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This paper presents a review of cross-shore sediment transport for non-cohesive sediments in the coastal zone. The principles of sediment incipient motion are introduced. Formulations for the estimation of bedload transport are presented, for currents and combined waves and current flows. A method [...] Read more.
This paper presents a review of cross-shore sediment transport for non-cohesive sediments in the coastal zone. The principles of sediment incipient motion are introduced. Formulations for the estimation of bedload transport are presented, for currents and combined waves and current flows. A method to consider the effect of sediment heterogeneity on transport, using the hiding–exposure coefficient and hindrance factor, is depicted. Total transport resulting from bedload and transport by suspension is also addressed. New research is encouraged to fill the knowledge gap on this topic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport in the Coastal Zone)
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