Water Management of Agricultural and Forest Ecosystems under Climate Change

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2023) | Viewed by 7325

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA
Interests: plant stress physiology; climate change; crop physiology; plant hydraulics; regional hydrology; drought; sustainability science; ecophysiology
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Guest Editor
University of Maine Cooperative Extension, Orono, ME 04469, USA
Interests: irrigation water management; evapotranspiration; irrigation scheduling; smart irrigation
School of Forest Resources, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5755, USA
Interests: innovative technologies to improve the energy efficiency of energy-intensive wood industry and timber-based building sector; advanced carbon-neutral bioproducts, such as engineered wood products and mass timber panel products; numerical analysis of hydrothermal behavior of wood and engineered wood products; utilization of sustainable and renewable biomass as bioenergy resources
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water use of agricultural and forest ecosystems will change under global climate change. For instance, warming will result in increased water loss of soils and plants, enhancing water deficits to crops and forest trees. Whether crops and forest trees can enhance their water efficiency to maintain productivity under increased water deficits is not well understood. Further, increased climate variability and extreme events such as drought and flood will also make water management more difficult. Sustainable solutions and new techniques are needed to combat climate change and secure crop and timber production. Some precision agriculture approaches can probably enhance the water use efficiency of agricultural systems, and some new soil amendment techniques such as biochar can at least partly reduce the effect of increased fluctuations in rainfall.

This Special Issue aims to gather high-quality papers emphasizing changes in the water use of agricultural and forest ecosystems under climate change, and solutions and techniques to mitigate the effect of climate change. Submitted contributions will go through a peer-review process performed by independent reviewers. Original case studies and review papers are invited for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. YongJiang Zhang
Dr. Sumon Datta
Dr. Ling Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • water resources
  • warming
  • global change
  • precision agriculture
  • biochar
  • mulch
  • water use efficiency
  • climate change mitigation
  • forestry
  • agriculture

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 6904 KiB  
Article
Investment in Forest Watershed—A Model of Good Practice for Sustainable Development of Ecosystems
by Iulia Diana Arion, Felix H. Arion, Ioan Tăut, Iulia Cristina Mureșan, Marioara Ilea and Marcel Dîrja
Water 2023, 15(4), 754; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15040754 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2564
Abstract
Estimating the efficiency of the investments that generate public benefits is not an easy task, as there are various methods proposed for evaluating the value of public goods and services. The novelty of the study consists of the proposed cost–benefit methodology adapted to [...] Read more.
Estimating the efficiency of the investments that generate public benefits is not an easy task, as there are various methods proposed for evaluating the value of public goods and services. The novelty of the study consists of the proposed cost–benefit methodology adapted to a real-value cost concept for estimating the efficiency of the investment in the hydrographic Fâncel watershed, in the center of Romania, using a set of five indicators. The results prove that an investment of RON 1,323,226.29, at the value of 2018, would be paid in 5 years, 0 months, and 15 days. The estimated income is RON 505,327.8/year, so at a 5% financial-discount rate and an estimated period of use of 30 years, the net present value is RON 5,612,730.67. The internal rate of return was calculated as 22%, whereas the value of the savings-to-investment ratio is 3.6%. The main findings of the analysis of the economic-efficiency indicators offer a synthetic and relevant image of the fact that the investment has proven to be effective under the analyzed conditions. The results offer arguments to assume that the decision to consider that particular investment a good practice is fulfilled. Full article
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16 pages, 7925 KiB  
Article
Future Rainfall Erosivity over Iran Based on CMIP5 Climate Models
by Behnoush Farokhzadeh, Ommolbanin Bazrafshan, Vijay P. Singh, Sepide Choobeh and Mohsen Mohseni Saravi
Water 2022, 14(23), 3861; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14233861 - 27 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1818
Abstract
Soil erosion affects agricultural production, and industrial and socioeconomic development. Changes in rainfall intensity lead to changes in rainfall erosivity (R-factor) energy and consequently changes soil erosion rate. Prediction of soil erosion is therefore important for soil and water conservation. The purpose of [...] Read more.
Soil erosion affects agricultural production, and industrial and socioeconomic development. Changes in rainfall intensity lead to changes in rainfall erosivity (R-factor) energy and consequently changes soil erosion rate. Prediction of soil erosion is therefore important for soil and water conservation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of changes in climatic parameters (precipitation) on soil erosion rates in the near future (2046–2065) and far future (2081–2100). For this purpose, the CMIP5 series models under two scenarios RCP2.6 and RCP8.5 were used to predict precipitation and the R-factor using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. Rainfall data from synoptic stations for 30 years were used to estimate the R- factor in the RUSLE model. Results showed that Iran’s climate in the future would face increasing rainfall, specially in west and decreasing rainfall in the central and northern parts. Therefore, there is an increased possibility of more frequent occurrences of heavy and torrential rains. Results also showed that the transformation of annual rainfall was not related to the spatial change of erosion. In the central and southern parts, the intensity of rainfall would increase. Therefore, erosion would be more in the south and central areas. Full article
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16 pages, 4004 KiB  
Article
Baseflow Persistence and Magnitude in Oil Palm, Logged and Primary Tropical Rainforest Catchments in Malaysian Borneo: Implications for Water Management under Climate Change
by Anand Nainar, Rory P. D. Walsh, Kawi Bidin, Nobuaki Tanaka, Kogila Vani Annammala, Umeswaran Letchumanan, Robert M. Ewers and Glen Reynolds
Water 2022, 14(22), 3791; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14223791 - 21 Nov 2022
Viewed by 2472
Abstract
While timber harvesting has plateaued, repeat-logging and conversion into plantations (especially oil palm) are still active in the tropics. The associated hydrological impacts especially pertaining to enhanced runoff, flood, and erosion have been well-studied, but little attention has been given to water resource [...] Read more.
While timber harvesting has plateaued, repeat-logging and conversion into plantations (especially oil palm) are still active in the tropics. The associated hydrological impacts especially pertaining to enhanced runoff, flood, and erosion have been well-studied, but little attention has been given to water resource availability in the humid tropics. In the light of the increasing climate extremes, this paper compared baseflow values and baseflow recession constants (K) between headwater catchments of five differing land-uses in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, namely primary forest (PF), old growth/virgin jungle reserve (VJR), twice-logged forest with 22 years regeneration (LF2), multiple-logged forest with 8 years regeneration (LF3), and oil palm plantation (OP). Hydrological and meteorological sensors and dataloggers were established in each catchment. Daily discharge was used for computing K via four estimation methods. Catchment ranks in terms of decreasing K were VJR (0.97841), LF3 (0.96692), LF2 (0.90347), PF (0.83886), and OP (0.86756). Catchment ranks in terms of decreasing annual baseflow were PF (1877 mm), LF3 (1265 mm), LF2 (812 mm), VJR (753 mm), and OP (367 mm), corresponding to 68%, 55%, 51%, 42%, and 38% of annual streamflow, respectively. Despite the low K, PF had the highest baseflow magnitude. OP had the fastest baseflow recession and lowest baseflow magnitude. Baseflow persistence decreased with increasing degree of disturbance. K showed strong association to catchment stem density instead of basal area. For dynamic catchments in this study, the Kb3 estimator is recommended based on its lowest combination of coefficient of variation (CoV) and root mean squared error (RMSE) of prediction. For wetter catchments with even shorter recession events, the Kb4 estimator may be considered. Regarding climate change, logging and oil palm agriculture should only be conducted after considering water resource availability. Forests (even degraded ones) should be conserved as much as possible in the headwaters for sustainable water resource. Full article
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