Special Issue "Strategies for Tourism and Hospitality after COVID-19"

A special issue of Tourism and Hospitality (ISSN 2673-5768).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Martin Thomas Falk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USN School of Business, University of South Eastern Norway, Gullbringvegen 36, 3800 Bø, Norway
Interests: applied economics; tourism economics; industrial economics; innovation and international economics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Miriam Scaglione
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Tourism, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland Valais, Sierre, Switzerland
Interests: e-tourism; management and observation tools; innovation; Valaisan tourism observatory; visitor flows
Dr. Alberto Amore
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
School of Business, Law and Communications, Solent University, Southampton, UK
Interests: destination resilience, overtourism; tourism planning; tourism crisis and disaster management; urban planning; urban tourism and urban regeneration
Dr. Bailey Ashton Adie
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Co-Guest Editor
Center for Tourism Research, Wakayama University, Wakayama, Japan
Interests: world Heritage; heritage tourism; visitor management; community-based tourism; tourism and development; tourism marketing and branding; second home tourism; community resilience; tourism and disasters; tourism and climate change; overtourism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tourism and travel have been reduced to a minimum during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is currently unclear when travel and tourism will be resumed. The CEO of Airbnb has formulated this as follows:

“We don’t know exactly when travel will return. When travel does return, it will look different.”

It is expected that domestic tourism will be the first to recover after the end of the lockdown, which will lead to a major shift in travel flows. Cities with a high population density, dependent on festival and event tourism, have a disadvantage, while destinations in rural areas have an advantage. Meanwhile, videoconferencing, visits to second homes in rural areas, and day trips are booming.

The journal Tourism and Hospitality is planning a Special Issue to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on tourism and hospitality. A special focus of the Special Issue is on quantitative studies using real-time data (social media data, mobility data, such as Google, website metrics, platform booking activity, etc.). 

Research questions and topics might include:

  • Which destinations and tourist attractions will benefit from the COVID-19 crisis?
  • How will tourist demand for urban and rural tourism change during the recovery phase?
  • What effects will the shift in tourism demand have on domestic tourism in the countries and regions?
  • What are the characteristics of regions that specifically ask tourists not to visit for fear that tourists will transport the virus from areas of high population density to rural areas?
  • Modeling the duration of travel warnings for business travelers and tourists at the regional and country level
  • Use of AirDNA data to model the change in short-term rentals (Airbnb)
  • Real-time crisis forecasting for different sectors and regions—building scenario techniques (i.e., shape of the turndown: V-shaped recession: steep decline, quick recovery; U-shaped recession: long period between decline and recovery; W-shaped recession: quick recovery, second decline; L-shaped recession: an extended downturn)
  • Contrafactual econometric models, including times series models and panel data models; estimating the extent of the loss across regions and sectors
  • Perception of risk, vulnerabilities, and resilience by supply and demand sides using advanced methods such as conjoint analysis or choice models.

Studies that use real-time data are particularly welcome. Quantitative studies based on microdata are particularly appreciated (microeconometric methods, statistical model time series, and panel data models). Case studies for specific regions are also welcome. Standalone surveys should cover several regions to facilitate comparisons.

Dr. Martin Thomas Falk
Dr. Miriam Scaglione
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tourism and Hospitality is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • tourism demand
  • short-term rentals
  • government regulations
  • social media data
  • real-time forecasting crisis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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Review
Place Branding—The Challenges of Getting It Right: Coping with Success and Rebuilding from Crises
Tour. Hosp. 2021, 2(1), 173-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp2010010 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1876
Abstract
A focus on continued year-on-year economic growth was beginning to be seen as unsustainable even before the COVID-19 crisis forced many tourism destinations to rethink their marketing and branding. This paper adopts a critical marketing stance to explore the relationship between place branding [...] Read more.
A focus on continued year-on-year economic growth was beginning to be seen as unsustainable even before the COVID-19 crisis forced many tourism destinations to rethink their marketing and branding. This paper adopts a critical marketing stance to explore the relationship between place branding and two recent extreme conditions affecting the tourism industry: overtourism, as exemplified when the issue became headline news in popular media from the summer of 2017, as many examples were offered of places struggling to cope with their success; and the COVID-19 crisis that effectively brought global tourism to a standstill in 2020, as the industry attempts to rebuild from this current unprecedented crisis. This article is not designed to suggest normative place-branding strategies. Rather, through the presentation of an original model that conceptualizes the cyclical process of rebuilding from crises and coping with success, it aims to provide a warning that whatever place-branding strategies are implemented in a post-pandemic world, for whatever type of tourism, in whatever type of destination, a rein must be employed in order that the drive for recovery from undertourism through successful place branding does not lead to the return of overtourism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strategies for Tourism and Hospitality after COVID-19)
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Case Report
Habeas Corpus: Argentinean Tourists Stranded
Tour. Hosp. 2021, 2(4), 327-331; https://doi.org/10.3390/tourhosp2040021 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 692
Abstract
COVID-19 has doubtless generated a great negative impact in the tourism industry. The measures disposed by governments to contain the virus included strict lockdowns and the closure of borders and airspaces, without mentioning the imposition of social distancing. As a result of this, [...] Read more.
COVID-19 has doubtless generated a great negative impact in the tourism industry. The measures disposed by governments to contain the virus included strict lockdowns and the closure of borders and airspaces, without mentioning the imposition of social distancing. As a result of this, thousands of tourists were stranded abroad, without food or financial assistance. The recovery of the industry is slow, and gradually Europe and the US have returned to a new normal. In Argentina, rather, things have become worse. At the end of June, President Fernandez disposed a new border closure that left thousands of Argentineans stranded again. This case report focuses on the testimonies, fears and expectancies of those stranded tourists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strategies for Tourism and Hospitality after COVID-19)
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