Special Issue "Gender, Work-Family Interface and Organizational Action"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Work, Employment and the Labor Market".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2020) | Viewed by 7891

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Talia Esnard
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Behavioural Sciences, The University of West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Interests: gender; work and organizations
Prof. Dwayne Devonish
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management Studies, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados
Interests: work; stress; health and organizational behaviour
Dr. Marcia Nathai-Balkissoon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management Studies, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Interests: safety and health management; knowledge management; teaching and learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neoliberal reforms continue to change the nature of the economy and of dynamics surrounding the engagement of workers across the globe (Connelly & Gallager, 2004; Dolan & Garcia, 2002; Kuschel, 2017). Such global restructuring patterns also affect construct-changing gender roles, attitudes, orientations, and the negotiations of work and family (Lero, 2003; Wood & Eagly, 2010). Thus, while the interface between work and family serves as a major source of concern for researchers (Skinner, Elton, Auer, & Pocock, 2014) with increasing attention to the antecedents and negative consequences for workers (such as satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, burnout, absenteeism, retention, quality of life, well-being), the relative importance of gender orientations within the dynamics of that interaction remains less interrogated (Matias, Ferreira, Vieira, Cadina, Leal, & Matos, 2017; Shockley, Shen, DeNunzio, Avan, & Knudsen, 2017). Amid the COVID-19 pandemic and its nuanced implications, there have also been increasing concerns about the exacerbation of the tensions between work and family life for many across the globe.  These, and other issues, raise different questions related to work-family inequities, fit, and negotiations, as well as how organizations support meaningful participation, integration, and enrichment of work and family domains (Voydanoff, 2002; Parkes and Langford, 2008; Jang and Zippay, 2011).

We seek submissions therefore that address: (i) the interplay of the institutional, cultural, ideological contexts that (re)configure gender roles, (ii) the diverse ways in which these, and other exogenous factors (e.g. COVID-19), impact the work-family interface for diverse workers and across sectors, and, (iii) the extent to which organizations can effectively manage and implement policies and practices that promote diversity and social justice.

Dr. Talia Esnard
Prof. Dwayne Devonish
Dr. Marcia Nathai-Balkissoon
Guest Editors

References

  1. Connelly, C. E., and Gallagher, D. G. 2004. Emerging trends in contingent work research. Journal of Management, 30(6): 959-983.
  2. Dolan, S. L., and Garcia, S. 2002. Managing by values: Cultural redesign for strategic organizational change at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Journal of Management Development, 20(2): 101-117
  3. Jang, S. J., and Zippay, A. 2011. The juggling act: Managing work-life conflict and WLB. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services, 92(1): 84–90.
  4. Kuschel, K. 2017. The Work-Family Field: Gpas and missing links as opportunities for future research. Innovar, 27(66): 57-74.
  5. Lero, D. S. 2003. Dual-earner families. In M. Lynn (Ed.), Voices: Essays on Canadian families (2nd ed.). City, ON: Nelson Thomson Learning, pp. 6-31
  6. Matias, M., Ferreira, T., Vieira, J., Cadima, J., Leal, T., and Mean Matos, P. 2017. Workplace family support, parental satisfaction, and work-family conflict: individual and crossover effects among dual-earner couples. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 66(4): 628–652.
  7. Parkes, L.P. and Langford, P.H. 2008. “Work-life balance or work-life alignment? A test of the importance of work-life balance for employee engagement and intention to stay in organisations.” Journal of Management and Organization, 14(3): 267-284.
  8. Skinner, N., Elton, J., Auer, J. and Pocock, B. 2014. “Understanding and managing work-life interaction across the life course: a qualitative study,” Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 52(1): 93-109.
  9. Shockley, K. M., Shen, W., DeNunzio, M. M., Arvan, M. L., and Knudsen, E. A. 2017. Disentangling the relationship between gender and work-family conflict: an integration of theoretical perspectives using meta-analytic methods. Journal of Applied Psychology 102(12): 1601–1635.
  10. Voydanoff, P. (2002). Linkages between the work-family interface and work, family, and individual outcomes: An integrative model. Journal of Family Issues, 23(1), 138–164
  11. Wood, W., and Eagly, A. H. 2010. “Gender.” In Handbook of Social Psychology, Vol. 1, 5th Edn, edited by S. T. Fiske, D. T. Gilbert, and G. Lindzey. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, pp. 629–667.

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Keywords

  • neoliberal
  • gender
  • work-family interface, organizational policy
  • equity
  • social justice
  • COVID-19 impacts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
“It’s Not Just about Work and Living Conditions”: The Underestimation of the COVID-19 Pandemic for Black Canadian Women
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(6), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060210 - 02 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2452
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has increasingly been defined as the shecession for its disproportionate debilitating impact on women. Despite this gendered analysis, a number of health activists have called on governments to account for the experiences of Black communities as they are disproportionately suffering [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has increasingly been defined as the shecession for its disproportionate debilitating impact on women. Despite this gendered analysis, a number of health activists have called on governments to account for the experiences of Black communities as they are disproportionately suffering the effects of this pandemic. In the media’s address of the impact of the pandemic, we ask, what experiences are represented in news stories and are Black women present in these representations. Performing a content analysis of 108 news articles, a reading of media discourses through a racial lens reveals a homogenization of women’s experiences and an absence of the Black experience. In the small number of news stories that do focus on Black women, we see that the health disparities are not simply the result of precarious work and living conditions, but also the struggle against anti-Black racism on multiple fronts. In critiquing, however, we also bring forth the small number of news stories on the Black experience that speak to the desire and hope that can thrive outside of white supremacist structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Work-Family Interface and Organizational Action)
Article
Do Work–Life Measures Really Matter? The Impact of Flexible Working Hours and Home-Based Teleworking in Preventing Voluntary Employee Exits
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10010009 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3274
Abstract
Numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of work–life measures, which are designed to contribute to job quality and help reconcile employees’ work and personal lives. In our study, we asked whether such measures can also work as inducements to prevent employees from voluntarily [...] Read more.
Numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of work–life measures, which are designed to contribute to job quality and help reconcile employees’ work and personal lives. In our study, we asked whether such measures can also work as inducements to prevent employees from voluntarily leaving a firm. We considered flexible working hours and home-based teleworking as flexibility measures that are potentially attractive to all employees. To address the possible bias caused by sketchy implementation and their actual selective use, we chose to examine employees’ perceptions of the offer of these measures. We investigated the moderation of the effect by organizational culture and supervisor and coworker support. We controlled for several indicators of job quality, such as job satisfaction and perceived fairness, to isolate specific ways in which work–life measures contributed to voluntary employee exit, and checked for a selective attractiveness of work–life measures to parents and women as the main caregivers. Using a three-wave panel employer–employee survey, we estimated multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models for 5452 employees at 127 large German establishments. Our results confirmed that both types of flexibility measures were associated with a lower probability of voluntarily exit. This applied more to men than to women, and the probability was reduced by a demanding organizational culture. Both measures seemed not to be specifically designed to accommodate main caregivers but were attractive to the whole workforce. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Work-Family Interface and Organizational Action)
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Article
Entrepreneurial Behavior of SMEs and Characteristics of the Managers of Northwest Mexico
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10010008 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
The objective of this study is to determine the difference in the entrepreneurial behavior of companies based on the demographic characteristics of their manager or leader. To comply with the above, a quantitative, transversal, and non-experimental research study was carried out, which consisted [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to determine the difference in the entrepreneurial behavior of companies based on the demographic characteristics of their manager or leader. To comply with the above, a quantitative, transversal, and non-experimental research study was carried out, which consisted in applying an instrument to 262 managers of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in a northern city in Mexico. The collected information was analyzed in the software SPSS, version 26, with statistical testing by the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The main findings show that these companies have differences in their entrepreneurial behavior based on the age and educational level of their managers, while gender and seniority at work are not differentiating elements in relation to the above. This research generates different possibilities of studies to be carried out in large companies from other sectors, and suggests the inclusion of behavioral characteristics as study variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Work-Family Interface and Organizational Action)
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