Special Issue "Cohabitation: Race, Class, Gender and Nonmarital Unions"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760). This special issue belongs to the section "Gender Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 August 2022) | Viewed by 2153

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Amanda Miller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, University of Indianapolis, Indiana, IN 46227, USA
Interests: cohabitation; marriage; relationship satisfaction; union progression; domestic division of labor; fertility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The number of cohabiting couples has increased significantly over time- nearly tripling over the last two decades. As might be expected, as the number of couples cohabiting has grown, the Census Bureau reports that the composition of cohabiting households has changed. Cohabitors, on average, still tend to have less education and income than those who marry directly. But, cohabiting couples today are wealthier, more educated, older, and more racially and ethnically diverse than their counterparts were in the past. As cohabitation has become more socially acceptable, wider swaths of the population have chosen to live together unmarried. Still, overall trends obscure significant variability within and between couples, especially as it relates to race/ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender.

The aim of this special issue is to examine how the ways that the experience of cohabitation is similar or differs by race/ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods submissions as well as theoretical/conceptual pieces from a broad range of social science disciplines are invited. In addition, international research is particularly valuable given limited information on cohabitation outside of the United States and Western Europe. Submissions which focus on intersectionality and cohabitation are of special interest.

Dr. Amanda Miller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cohabitation
  • intersectionality
  • family
  • social class
  • gender
  • couples
  • intimate relationships

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Married and Cohabiting Finnish First-Time Parents: Differences in Wellbeing, Social Support and Infant Health
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(4), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11040181 - 18 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1123
Abstract
Cohabitation is more common than marriage when couples are expecting their first child in Finland. However, little is known about possible differences in wellbeing between the two groups. In this study, we examined differences in parental wellbeing, relationship satisfaction, infant health outcomes, and [...] Read more.
Cohabitation is more common than marriage when couples are expecting their first child in Finland. However, little is known about possible differences in wellbeing between the two groups. In this study, we examined differences in parental wellbeing, relationship satisfaction, infant health outcomes, and use of social support among cohabiting and married first-time parents. Survey data was collected from 903 parents during pregnancy and at one month postpartum. Cohabiting parents had more depressive symptoms than married parents. They were also less satisfied with their relationships and expressed less satisfaction with the quality of support they got from their partner. Cohabiting fathers did not use the cost-free support from maternity clinics as often as married fathers. Our results show differences in well-being between married and cohabiting first-time parents and that the support from maternity clinics should better acknowledge diversity and address the different needs of different types of families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cohabitation: Race, Class, Gender and Nonmarital Unions)
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