Special Issue "Methodological Advances in the Study of Health and Health Care of LGBT Populations"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Elbert P. Almazan
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Sociology, Central Michigan University, Anspach Hall 142, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA
Interests: LGBT health; health disparities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the past ten years, large, representative health surveys in the United States have included sexual orientation and gender identity questions. Consequently, survey samples are larger and more representative of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) populations. In addition, these improved samples allow for investigations of different measures of sexual orientation and gender identity.

This Special Issue focuses on empirical and methodological papers that use LGBT samples from large, representative health surveys. Manuscripts that are appropriate for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Replication of previous studies by using improved samples to obtain more accurate estimates of health and health care outcomes of LGBT populations.
  • Methodological studies that examine associations between different measures of LGBT populations and health-related outcomes.
  • Studies that demonstrate statistically significant sexual orientation and gender identity disparities in health and health care outcomes that were not obtainable in previous studies.
  • Studies that examine specific subgroups within these improved LGBT samples such as specific racial, ethnic, social class, gender, sexual identity, and gender identity groups.
  • Studies on health and health care outcomes of LGBT populations that have not received adequate attention.
  • Studies that examine contributors to health-related outcomes of LGBT populations.

Studies using representative samples of LGBT populations from local and national health surveys are welcomed. Papers can be of any length and should be written in a nontechnical style that can be read by a broad audience.

Dr. Elbert P. Almazan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sexual orientation
  • transgender
  • sexual minority
  • gender identity
  • lesbian, gay, bisexual
  • population
  • health
  • health care

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Beyond Depression and Suicide: The Mental Health of Transgender College Students
Soc. Sci. 2017, 6(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci6010020 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
Research studies examining the mental health of transgender individuals often focus on depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation through the use of clinic samples. However, little is known about the emerging adult (18–26 years old) transgender population and their mental health. The current study [...] Read more.
Research studies examining the mental health of transgender individuals often focus on depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation through the use of clinic samples. However, little is known about the emerging adult (18–26 years old) transgender population and their mental health. The current study seeks to fill that gap by using a national dataset of college students (N = 547,727) to examine how transgender college students (n = 1143) differ from their cisgender peers regarding 12 different mental health conditions. Chi-square and regression analyses were conducted. Results demonstrate that transgender students have approximately twice the risk for most mental health conditions compared to cisgender female students. A notable exception is schizophrenia, in which transgender individuals have about seven times the risk compared to cisgender females. While these were significant findings, regression analyses indicate that being non-heterosexual is a greater predictor for mental health concerns. Implications for mental health practitioners at colleges and universities are discussed. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Approaches to Sampling Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men from Geosocial-Networking Smartphone Applications: A Methodological Note
Soc. Sci. 2016, 5(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci5040051 - 22 Sep 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
Geosocial-networking smartphone applications utilize global positioning system (GPS) technologies to connect users based on their physical proximity. Many gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have smartphones, and these new mobile technologies have generated quicker and easier modes for [...] Read more.
Geosocial-networking smartphone applications utilize global positioning system (GPS) technologies to connect users based on their physical proximity. Many gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have smartphones, and these new mobile technologies have generated quicker and easier modes for MSM to meet potential partners. In doing so, these technologies may facilitate a user’s ability to have multiple concurrent partners, thereby increasing their risk for acquiring HIV or other sexually transmitted infections. Researchers have sought to recruit users of these applications (e.g., Grindr, Jack’d, Scruff) into HIV prevention studies, primarily through advertising on the application. Given that these advertisements often broadly targeted large urban areas, these approaches have generated samples that are not representative of the population of users of the given application in a given area. As such, we propose a method to generate a spatially representative sample of MSM via direct messaging on a given application using New York City and its geography as an example of this sampling and recruitment method. These methods can increase geographic representativeness and wider access to MSM who use geosocial-networking smartphone applications. Full article
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