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Special Issue "Selected Papers from SPWID, ALLSENSORS, SENSORCOMM, SENSORDEVICES, SMART ACCESSIBILITY, SIGNAL, CENICS, ICQNM"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jun Dong Cho
Website
Collection Editor
Department of Human ICT Convergence, Sungkyunjwan University, Seoul 16419, Korea
Interests: Human Computer Interaction; User Experience Design; Design for All; Accessibility for People with Visual Impairment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paulo E. Cruvinel
Website1 Website2
Collection Editor
Brazilian Corporation for Agricultural Research (Embrapa), Brasília, Brazil
Embrapa Instrumentation, São Carlos, Brazil
Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, Brazil
University of São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil
Interests: study and development of sensors; metering processes; physics applied to agriculture; intelligent systems; image processing; systems modelling; complex networks; knowledge systems; semantic computing and automation in agriculture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The science and technology of sensors has had a remarkable influence on smart wearable, implantable and disability-oriented devices and systems, as well as in the Agriculture 4.0, which demands smart sensors, and advanced decision support systems. Thus, both academia and industry who were presented their conference papers in conference events SPWID, ALLSENSORS, SENSORCOMM, SENSORDEVICES, SMART ACCESSIBILITY, SIGNAL, CENICS, ICQNM are invited to submit papers about any of following topics of interest:

Sensing Devices

Wearable devices; Implantable devices; Brain-driven devices (brain signal capturing devices); Wearable sensors, actuators, input/output devices; Smart textile technologies, textile sensing and feedback, e-textiles, smart fabrics; Eyewear mounted sensors and actuator systems; Wearable displays; Smart watches; Smart glasses; Smart night-vision devices; Smart audio drivers/amplifiers; Smart accompanying robots; Manufacturing challenges; Societal implications, health risk, environmental, food security, and privacy aspects

Assistive Devices

Smart/intelligent prosthetics; Organ replacement devices (artificial organs); Accompanying robots; Patient/citizen body-driven technology (self-adaptive devices to body's conditions); Devices for helping services for persons with sense disabilities (blind, not-mobile, etc.); Designing large-scale grids and clouds of smartphones for assistive coordination; Motion detection and activity recognition; Neurological disabilities; Personalization, customization and lifelong learning in activity recognition; sensors and actuators for autonomous agricultural vehicles and precision farming.

Applications

Design of smart clothing in medicine Virtual hospitals; Ambient-assisted living; Activity monitoring devices (walking, working, sleeping, exercising, …); Pain control devices; Lifestyle improvement devices; Alert and hazard situations monitoring devices; risk management in agriculture, food safety, logistic in agriculture, smart farming, collaborative agricultural machinery, and rational use of inputs for food production.

Prof. Dr. Jun Dong Cho
Prof. Dr. Paulo E. Cruvinel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). Only extended versions of the accepted and published papers in those 8 events are considered in this collection. Please provide the IARIA Paper ID in the cover letter during submission. All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microwave Transmittance Technique Using Microstrip Patch Antennas, as a Non-Invasive Tool to Determine Soil Moisture in Rhizoboxes
Sensors 2020, 20(4), 1166; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20041166 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
Investigating the growth behavior of plant root systems as a function of soil water is considered an important information for the study of root physiology. A non-invasive tool based on electromagnetic wave transmittance in the microwave frequency range, operating close to 4.8 GHz, [...] Read more.
Investigating the growth behavior of plant root systems as a function of soil water is considered an important information for the study of root physiology. A non-invasive tool based on electromagnetic wave transmittance in the microwave frequency range, operating close to 4.8 GHz, was developed using microstrip patch antennas to determine the volumetric moisture of soil in rhizoboxes. Antennas were placed on both sides of the rhizobox and, using a vector network analyzer, measured the S parameters. The dispersion parameter S21 (dB) was also used to show the effect of different soil types and temperature on the measurement. In addition, system sensitivity, reproducibility and repeatability were evaluated. The quantitative results of the soil moisture, measured in rhizoboxes, presented in this paper, demonstrate that the microwave technique using microstrip patch antennas is a reliable, non-invasive and accurate system, and has shown potentially promising applications for measurement of rhizobox-based root phenotyping. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Version Reporting and Assessment Approaches for New and Updated Activity and Heart Rate Monitors
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1705; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071705 - 10 Apr 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
This paper addresses the significant need for improvements in device version reporting and practice across the academic and technical activity monitoring literature, and it recommends assessments for new and updated consumer sensing devices. Reproducibility and data veracity are central to good scholarship, and [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the significant need for improvements in device version reporting and practice across the academic and technical activity monitoring literature, and it recommends assessments for new and updated consumer sensing devices. Reproducibility and data veracity are central to good scholarship, and particularly significant in clinical and health applications. Across the literature there is an absence of device version reporting and a failure to recognize that device validity is not maintained when firmware and software updates can, and do, change device performance and parameter estimation. In this paper, we propose the use of tractable methods to assess devices at their current version and provide an example empirical approach. Experimental results for heart rate and step count acquisitions during walking and everyday living activities from Garmin Vivosmart 3 (v4.10) wristband monitors are presented and analyzed, and the reliability issues of optically-acquired heart rates, especially during periods of activity, are demonstrated and discussed. In conclusion, the paper recommends the empirical assessment of new and updated activity monitors and improvements in device version reporting across the academic and technical literature. Full article
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