Special Issue "Mental Health Disorders and Nursing Implications in the COVID-19 Era"

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health and the COVID-19 Pandemic (MHC)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 1218

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elsa Vitale
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mental Health, Local Healthcare Company Bari, Via X Marzo, 43, 70026 Modugno, BA, Italy
Interests: psychiatric nursing; holistic nursing; orthopedic nursing; gender role research
Prof. Dr. Eman Salman Taie
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Nursing, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt
Interests: nursing administration; nursing education; human resource development (nurses and others); artificial intelligence in nursing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue will explore mental health disorders and nursing implications in the COVID-19 era across all areas of nursing to provide a multidimensional overview of the present issue.

Since the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has brought about rapid and unprecedented changes to daily activities, the spread of the virus, its death toll and the drastic measures taken to contain the disease have continued to be significant. Despite the considerable efforts to enact measures to identify infected people, mental health needs have been relatively neglected. In past mass tragedies, particularly those caused by infectious diseases, the general population experienced fear and anxiety, negatively impacting their psychological well-being. In fact, studies have reported many psychiatric symptoms in the earliest stage of the pandemic, such as persistent depression, anxiety, panic attacks and even self-harm, and there were higher levels of depression in people who had been quarantined or whose families and friends had been quarantined due to possibility of infection.

The global COVID-19 pandemic also has challenged healthcare leaders everywhere to rapidly address challenges in quality, safety, patient family and the workforce. Nursing leaders have organized emergency care management; adapted infection prevention guidelines; developed supply chain methods; and directly cared for patients, families and nursing personnel through their constant presence on the site.

The present Special Issue will underline mental health disorders occurring among nurses and the general population and nursing implications of these conditions in the context of COVID-19. Additionally, research on conditions related to the COVID-19 era, such as nurse leaders' challenges, empowering leader behavior, nursing workload, nursing work environmental organization and technology innovations, will be considered for this multidisciplinary issue on the COVID-19 era and related nursing implications.

Dr. Elsa Vitale
Prof. Dr. Eman Salman Taie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Psych is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mental health disorders: anxiety, depression, insomnia
  • nursing implications
  • nurse leaders' challenges
  • empowering leader behavior in COVID-19
  • nursing education
  • general population and nursing interventions
  • nursing workload
  • nursing work environment organization
  • communication
  • technology innovations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Anxiety, Depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Physicians Compared to Nurses during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Observational, Cross Sectional, Multicentric Study
Psych 2022, 4(3), 465-474; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych4030036 - 02 Aug 2022
Viewed by 229
Abstract
(1) Background: The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the precarious health situation of our country, thanks to the grueling workloads caused by understaffing and fear of contracting COVID-19. By considering this critical situation, frontline healthcare professionals who have been directly involved in the diagnosis, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the precarious health situation of our country, thanks to the grueling workloads caused by understaffing and fear of contracting COVID-19. By considering this critical situation, frontline healthcare professionals who have been directly involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of SARS-CoV-2 patients are now at risk of developing psychological distress and other mental health symptoms, accomplices of the fear of contracting the COVID-19 and the exhausting workloads. (2) Methods: An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted by administering an online questionnaire to all Italian physicians and nurses who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire consists of socio-demographic characteristics, an assessment of anxiety levels with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), which also assessed trait and state anxiety, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to evaluate the condition of depressive severity, and, finally, the Impact of Event Scale–Revised (IES–R), which was administered in order to quantify the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among the participants. (3) Results: A total of 770 Italian healthcare workers were enrolled in this study. Of these, 95 (12.30%) were physicians and 675 (87.70%) were nurses. By considering PTSD, anxiety, and depression levels between the physicians and nurses recruited, a significant difference was reported in the STAI-1 assessment, as both physicians and nurses reported slight and moderate levels (p = 0.033). (4) Conclusions: Physicians and nurses, who have been subjected to physical impoverishment, with the infinite physical forces spent to support the pace of work at the limits of the possible, but above all mental capacity, with the anxiety of having to face an unknown enemy, such as COVID-19. This has resulted in a significant increase in anxiety, depression, post-traumatic symptoms, and sleep disturbances, with possible repercussions not only on the quality of life of the physicians and nurses but also on the quality of assistance provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Disorders and Nursing Implications in the COVID-19 Era)
Article
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Registered Nurses and Nursing Students in Italy during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study
Psych 2022, 4(3), 387-395; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych4030032 - 08 Jul 2022
Viewed by 278
Abstract
(1) Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder characterized by a range of syndromal responses to extreme stressors. The present study aimed to explore any differences in PTSD between registered nurses and nursing students, according to sex and nursing experience, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder characterized by a range of syndromal responses to extreme stressors. The present study aimed to explore any differences in PTSD between registered nurses and nursing students, according to sex and nursing experience, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2): Methods: An observational descriptive study was conducted among Italian nurses and nursing students during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. An online questionnaire was distributed in an anonymous form through the Google function of Google Modules to some social pages and nursing groups. (3) Results: In total, 576 participants were enrolled in this study. Of these, 291 (50.50%) were registered nurses and 285 (49.50%) were nursing students. By considering the Impact of Event Scale—Revised values in nurses and in nursing students according to sex, a significant difference was reported in the avoidance sub-dimension (p = 0.024), as female nurses recorded higher levels than nursing students. No further significant differences were suggested by considering both sex and nursing experience, respectively. (4) Conclusion: PTSD could be a serious consequence for both nurses and nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Disorders and Nursing Implications in the COVID-19 Era)
Article
Exploring Internet Addiction in Italian Nurses during the COVID-19 Outbreak
Psych 2022, 4(2), 292-300; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych4020026 - 02 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 341
Abstract
(1) Background: Nomophobia is considered a digital and virtual contemporary society disorder and refers to discomfort, anxiety, nervousness, or distress caused by being out of contact with a cell phone or computer. The present study had a twofold objective: to evaluate the expert [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Nomophobia is considered a digital and virtual contemporary society disorder and refers to discomfort, anxiety, nervousness, or distress caused by being out of contact with a cell phone or computer. The present study had a twofold objective: to evaluate the expert use of the Internet among Italian nurses by correlating it with socio-demographic characteristics, such as: sex, years of work experience, professional role, and level of nursing education; and to assess a possible increase in the levels of nomophobia among Italian nurses during COVID-19 compared to the pre-pandemic period. (2) Methods: An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from April to September 2020, such as during the First Wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. (3) Results: A total of 502 nurses were enrolled in the present study. Significantly differences were reported in the IAT (Internet Addiction Test) levels according to socio-demographic characteristics since males reported significantly higher IAT levels than females (p < 0.001). Nurses who worked more than 6 years reported significantly higher IAT levels (p = 0.031) than their younger colleagues. More nursing managers and coordinators reported significantly higher IAT levels than registered nurses (p < 0.001). This trend was repeated by considering the nursing educational level, as nurses who recorded more years of nursing educational level reported significantly higher IAT levels than the others (p = 0.003). Additionally, significant differences were reported according to all the socio-demographic characteristics considered and IAT subdimensions, namely: Salience, Excessive Use, Neglect Work, Anticipation, and Lack of Control. (4) Conclusions: The study revealed higher levels of Internet addiction in men than in women during the COVID-19 pandemic period, as well as a significant correlation between nomophobia, years of work experience, and the role of nursing coordinator/manager. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Disorders and Nursing Implications in the COVID-19 Era)
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