Special Issue "Colletotrichum spp. on Fruit Crops – State of the Art, Perspectives and Drawbacks"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sónia Gomes
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Guest Editor
University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal. Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisboa, BioISI/UTAD, Portugal
Interests: Food security; Plant-pathogen interaction; Pathogen-related genes; Genomics; Molecular methods; Olea europaea L.; Colletotrichum spp.; qPCR; real-time PCR; High resolution melting (HRM)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colletotrichum spp. are one of the most notorious plant pathogenic fungi that affect important croc production and global food security. Climate change and ongoing globalization are the two major challenges of the 21st century for plant pathogen evolution and disease-resistant crops. It is therefore essential to design new breeding strategies to improve disease resistance in fruit crops and to transfer this knowledge to farmers in the required time frame. The multidisciplinary research programs on evolution and diversity of Colletotrichum spp., plant–pathogen molecular and ecological interactions, fungal genomes consortium, genome editing, and epidemiology studies have been revealing remarkable features of Colletotrichum spp. For this Special Issue of Pathogens, we invite you to submit innovative research and review articles, as well as brief communications related to Colletotrichum spp. Complex—OMICS approaches and scientific challenges—to ensure food security and develop novel strategies to control crop diseases in the context of the world’s global challenges. We look forward to your contribution.

Dr. Sónia Gomes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Colletotrichum spp.
  • fruits
  • plant–pathogen interactions
  • disease resistance
  • food security
  • genomics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Persistent Calyxes in Postbloom Fruit Drop: A Microscopy and Microanalysis Perspective
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040251 - 28 Mar 2020
Abstract
Citrus postbloom fruit drop, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is an important disease in the Americas. The pathogen infects citrus flowers, produces orange-brown lesions on petals, and may cause the abscission of young fruit. In diseased flowers, the calyxes remain attached to the peduncle [...] Read more.
Citrus postbloom fruit drop, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is an important disease in the Americas. The pathogen infects citrus flowers, produces orange-brown lesions on petals, and may cause the abscission of young fruit. In diseased flowers, the calyxes remain attached to the peduncle after the young fruit drop. No anatomical and microanalysis studies have been conducted to determine whether calyx tissues can be infected by Colletotrichum spp. and why calyxes remain attached to the peduncle. Based on light microscopy, we demonstrate that the ovary abscission zone exhibits a separation region composed of layers of thickened lignified walled cells, indicating that abscission involves the disruption of cell walls. The first layers of the protective zone (PZ) are composed of densely packed cells with suberized walls produced by the wound meristem. Beneath the PZ, there is a compact mass of small cells that accumulate starch grains. X-ray fluorescence microanalysis (µ-XRF) confirmed the increased accumulation of calcium in the receptacle of the persistent calyxes compared to non-inoculated citrus flowers. Moreover, the peduncle pith and the receptacle exhibit hypertrophied cells with thick walls that may be related to calyx retention. Fungal structures are not observed inside the persistent calyx tissues. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
CgSCD1 Is Essential for Melanin Biosynthesis and Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020141 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, an important phytopathogenic fungus, mainly infects tropical fruits and results in serious anthracnose. Previous studies have shown that melanin biosynthesis inhibitor can inhibit the melanization of the appressoria of Magnaporthe grisea and Colletotrichum orbiculare, resulting in limited infection of [...] Read more.
Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, an important phytopathogenic fungus, mainly infects tropical fruits and results in serious anthracnose. Previous studies have shown that melanin biosynthesis inhibitor can inhibit the melanization of the appressoria of Magnaporthe grisea and Colletotrichum orbiculare, resulting in limited infection of the hosts. In this study, we identified and characterized a scytalone dehydratase gene (CgSCD1) from C. gloeosporioides which is involved in melanin synthesis. The CgSCD1 gene deletion mutant ΔCgscd1 was obtained using homologous recombination. The ΔCgscd1 mutant showed no melanin accumulation on appressoria formation and vegetative hyphae. Furthermore, the virulence of ΔCgscd1 was significantly reduced in comparison with the wild-type (WT) strain. Further investigations showed that the growth rate as well as germination and appressorium formation of ΔCgscd1 displayed no difference compared to the wild-type and complemented transformant Cgscd1com strains. Furthermore, we found that the appressorial turgor pressure in the ΔCgscd1 mutant showed no difference compared to that in the WT and Cgscd1com strains in the incipient cytorrhysis experiment. However, fewer infectious hyphae of ΔCgscd1 were observed in the penetration experiments, suggesting that the penetration ability of nonpigmented appressoria was partially impaired. In conclusion, we identified the CgSCD1 gene, which is involved in melanin synthesis and pathogenicity, and found that the melanization defect did not affect appressorial turgor pressure in C. gloeosporioides. Full article
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