Special Issue "Non-coding RNAs Involved in Cancer Chemoresistance"

A special issue of Non-Coding RNA (ISSN 2311-553X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Duncan Ayers
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre for Molecular Medicine and Biobanking, University of Malta, Msida MSD2080, Malta
2. Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7DN, UK
Interests: microRNA; miRNA; long noncoding RNA; lncRNA; noncoding RNA; ncRNA; cancer; tumour; chemoresistance; drug resistance
Dr. Ali Rihani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SE-171 77 Sweden
Interests: microRNA; miRNA; long noncoding RNA; lncRNA; noncoding RNA; ncRNA; cancer; tumour; chemoresistance; drug resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past two decades, following the discovery of the RNA interference pathway by Fire and Mello, the biological and clinical roles of noncoding RNA families of the ‘dark matter’ of the genome have evolved rapidly. Presently, these families include microRNAs and long noncoding RNA families that are already acknowledged to have widespread implications for all physiological processes within the mammalian cell through their highly effective gene regulatory roles. Consequently, noncoding RNA family elements can—when dysregulated—allow for the pathogenesis and progression of a myriad of medical conditions, including cancer. Furthermore, on focusing on the noncoding RNA influences in cancer, specific tumour characteristics can be exacerbated or inhibited through noncoding RNA direction. This Special Issue aims to delve deeper and consolidate all recent global research efforts (research articles/reviews) for specific noncoding RNA biomarker discovery and validation, including mechanistic implications of noncoding RNAs in the development (and regulation) of the drug resistant tumour phenotype, for possible theranostic exploitation in the near future.

Dr. Duncan Ayers
Dr. Ali Rihani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Non-Coding RNA is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microRNA
  • miRNA
  • Long noncoding RNA
  • lncRNA
  • noncoding RNA
  • ncRNA
  • Cancer
  • Tumor
  • Chemoresistance
  • Drug resistance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Review
An Analysis of Mechanisms for Cellular Uptake of miRNAs to Enhance Drug Delivery and Efficacy in Cancer Chemoresistance
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna7020027 - 16 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1959
Abstract
Up until recently, it was believed that pharmaceutical drugs and their metabolites enter into the cell to gain access to their targets via simple diffusion across the hydrophobic lipid cellular membrane, at a rate which is based on their lipophilicity. An increasing amount [...] Read more.
Up until recently, it was believed that pharmaceutical drugs and their metabolites enter into the cell to gain access to their targets via simple diffusion across the hydrophobic lipid cellular membrane, at a rate which is based on their lipophilicity. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that the phospholipid bilayer-mediated drug diffusion is in fact negligible, and that drugs pass through cell membranes via proteinaceous membrane transporters or carriers which are normally used for the transportation of nutrients and intermediate metabolites. Drugs can be targeted to specific cells and tissues which express the relevant transporters, leading to the design of safe and efficacious treatments. Furthermore, transporter expression levels can be manipulated, systematically and in a high-throughput manner, allowing for considerable progress in determining which transporters are used by specific drugs. The ever-expanding field of miRNA therapeutics is not without its challenges, with the most notable one being the safe and effective delivery of the miRNA mimic/antagonist safely to the target cell cytoplasm for attaining the desired clinical outcome, particularly in miRNA-based cancer therapeutics, due to the poor efficiency of neo-vascular systems revolting around the tumour site, brought about by tumour-induced angiogenesis. This acquisition of resistance to several types of anticancer drugs can be as a result of an upregulation of efflux transporters expression, which eject drugs from cells, hence lowering drug efficacy, resulting in multidrug resistance. In this article, the latest available data on human microRNAs has been reviewed, together with the most recently described mechanisms for miRNA uptake in cells, for future therapeutic enhancements against cancer chemoresistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNAs Involved in Cancer Chemoresistance)
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Review
The Mechanistic Roles of ncRNAs in Promoting and Supporting Chemoresistance of Colorectal Cancer
Non-Coding RNA 2021, 7(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna7020024 - 31 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2268
Abstract
Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies which has quite a high mortality rate. Despite the advances made in CRC treatment, effective therapy is still quite challenging, particularly due to resistance arising throughout the treatment regimen. Several studies have [...] Read more.
Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies which has quite a high mortality rate. Despite the advances made in CRC treatment, effective therapy is still quite challenging, particularly due to resistance arising throughout the treatment regimen. Several studies have been carried out to identify CRC chemoresistance mechanisms, with research showing different signalling pathways, certain ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), among others to be responsible for the failure of CRC chemotherapies. In the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that certain non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families are involved in chemoresistance. Research investigations have demonstrated that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and circular RNAs (circRNAs) contribute towards promoting resistance in CRC via different mechanisms. Considering the currently available data on this phenomenon, a better understanding of how these ncRNAs participate in chemoresistance can lead to suitable solutions to overcome this problem in CRC. This review will first focus on discussing the different mechanisms of CRC resistance identified so far. The focus will then shift onto the roles of miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs in promoting 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin (OXA), cisplatin and doxorubicin (DOX) resistance in CRC, specifically using ncRNAs which have been recently identified and validated under in vivo or in vitro conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNAs Involved in Cancer Chemoresistance)
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Review
NEAT1 and Paraspeckles in Cancer Development and Chemoresistance
Non-Coding RNA 2020, 6(4), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna6040043 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2450
Abstract
Non-coding RNA were previously thought to be biologically useless molecules arising from simple transcriptional noise. These are now known to be an integral part of cellular biology and pathology. The wide range of RNA molecules have a diverse range of structures, functions, and [...] Read more.
Non-coding RNA were previously thought to be biologically useless molecules arising from simple transcriptional noise. These are now known to be an integral part of cellular biology and pathology. The wide range of RNA molecules have a diverse range of structures, functions, and mechanisms of action. However, structural long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a particular class of ncRNA that are proving themselves more and more important in cellular biology, as the exact structures that such RNAs form and stabilise become more understood. Nuclear Enriched Abundant Transcript 1 (NEAT1) is a specific structural RNA emerging as a critical component in the progress and development of cancer. NEAT1 forms part of multiple biological pathways, acting through a diverse group of mechanisms. The most important of these is the formation of the paraspeckle, through which it can influence the stability of a tumour to develop resistance to drugs. This review will thus cover the range of effects by which NEAT1 interacts with cancer progression in order to describe the various roles of NEAT1 in chemoresistance, as well as to identify drug targets that protein research alone could not provide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-coding RNAs Involved in Cancer Chemoresistance)
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