Cyberlaw and Information Policy

A special issue of Laws (ISSN 2075-471X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2016) | Viewed by 16724

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004, USA
2. School of Law, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325, USA
Interests: cyberlaw; information law; privacy law; trademark and unfair competition law; copyright law; digital technology; law and the creative arts (especially law of the publishing industry); international law; intellectual property law

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Internet is no longer a new phenomenon, although it now follows us around in our pockets and briefcases and we access online services through smartphones, iPads, and other portable devices every day. Social networking has taken online interactions to a new plane in recent years and we are wirelessly connected all the time.

Regulation of online interactions has not necessarily kept pace with, and may never be able to keep pace with, emerging technologies and the way we use them in our daily social, commercial, and other interactions. New issues involving intellectual property rights, privacy, cyber-victimization, online contracting, fraud, and deception seem to arise every day. Domestic governments have not necessarily taken a harmonized approach to these issues as is evidenced by diverging laws relating to personal privacy between the European Union and the United States.

This Special Issue seeks articles that focus on any law, policy, regulatory or theoretical aspect of the challenges posed by new developments in digital technology with particular reference to information exchanges in social, commercial, educational, medical, artistic, and other contexts. How should online information exchanges be regulated? Or should they be regulated at all? Is law no longer the most appropriate mode of online regulation and should we rely instead on government agreements, social and institutional norms, market forces and public education to protect our rights online? Can intellectual property, privacy, defamation, and anti-bullying laws keep pace with rapid changes in the way we interact online? How should governments around the world respond to calls for legal reform? Should governments attempt to harmonize laws across national boundaries? These and other related questions can be addressed through this call for papers.

Please feel free to forward this call for papers to anyone who might be interested in submitting a paper.

Prof. Jacqueline D. Lipton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Laws is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cyberlaw
  • Information Law
  • Digital Technology
  • Intellectual Property
  • Privacy
  • Defamation
  • Internet Governance
  • Computer software
  • Electronic Licensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

200 KiB  
Article
Governance of the Internet of Things—From Infancy to First Attempts of Implementation?
by Rolf H. Weber
Laws 2016, 5(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5030028 - 24 Jun 2016
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 7453
Abstract
In the course of the Internet’s growing importance within the last decade, the Internet of Things (IoT) has also been a subject of much debate. Being defined by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) as the development of item identifications, sensor technologies and the [...] Read more.
In the course of the Internet’s growing importance within the last decade, the Internet of Things (IoT) has also been a subject of much debate. Being defined by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) as the development of item identifications, sensor technologies and the ability to interact with the environment, the term Internet of Things, in more simple words, stands for a technology that is based on the connection of everyday objects to the Internet which exchange, aggregate and process information regarding their physical environment for providing value-added services to end-users. Notwithstanding the extensive research activities having been conducted in the recent past and the broad consensus as to the necessity of a basic normative framework for IoT applications, a final multilateral agreement is still missing. In this respect, an analysis of possible approaches solving the present challenges seems to be worthwhile to conduct. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberlaw and Information Policy)
192 KiB  
Article
The Proportionality and Solidarity Principles and Their Impact on Privacy Laws in German Jurisprudence
by Klaus Schmidt and Alejandro Laje
Laws 2016, 5(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5020027 - 15 Jun 2016
Viewed by 4380
Abstract
Privacy laws and the use of information technology that guarantee confidentiality and information integrity are components of an individual’s rights in German jurisprudence. The protection of a person’s identity, information, ideas, feelings, emotions and particularly the way to communicate them is considered essential [...] Read more.
Privacy laws and the use of information technology that guarantee confidentiality and information integrity are components of an individual’s rights in German jurisprudence. The protection of a person’s identity, information, ideas, feelings, emotions and particularly the way to communicate them is considered essential to human dignity. Extensive studies in these areas has made this protection a central pillar of law-related research in Germany. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberlaw and Information Policy)

Other

Jump to: Research

197 KiB  
Case Report
Lux In Arcana: Decoding the Right to Be Forgotten in Digital Archives
by Patricia Sanchez Abril and Eugenio Pizarro Moreno
Laws 2016, 5(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5030033 - 12 Aug 2016
Viewed by 4451
Abstract
On 13 May 2014, the European Court of Justice ruled that search engines such as Google had a duty to respect EU citizens’ right to be forgotten. That is, the search engines—deemed “controllers” of information under the Directive—were obligated in some circumstances to [...] Read more.
On 13 May 2014, the European Court of Justice ruled that search engines such as Google had a duty to respect EU citizens’ right to be forgotten. That is, the search engines—deemed “controllers” of information under the Directive—were obligated in some circumstances to remove or de-list links from search results that pertain to information that infringes on an individual’s rights under the Directive. In the fall of 2015, the Spanish Supreme Court found itself obligated to determine the application of the digital right to be forgotten in a different context: This time in a digital newspaper archive. However, since the right to be forgotten is purely judicially-created and not yet memorialized in a regulation (other than through judicial interpretations of the European Directive 1995/46/EC of the European Parliament and Council of 24 October on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data), it is therefore appropriate to analyze Spain’s recent Supreme Court ruling as an indicator of the future of the right. What does this decision mean for the future of the right to be forgotten? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberlaw and Information Policy)
Back to TopTop