Special Issue "Future Wireless Systems for Human Bond Communications"

A special issue of Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks (ISSN 2224-2708).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Enrico Del Re
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Engineering, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: next generation wireless terrestrial; satellite systems; digital signal processing; security; privacy; human bond communications
Dr. Lorenzo Mucchi
Website
Guest Editor
DINFO, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Interests: wireless sensors and body area networks; security and privacy; radio propagation and modelling; molecular communications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Simone Morosi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Engineering, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: TLC; ICT; signal processing; energy efficiency; human bond communications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extensive research and innovations have started to change user requirements for new services and applications, thanks to the expansion and rapid penetration of ICT. Today, the evolution of wireless communication systems is typically focused on improving the performance of information exchange between two or more communication nodes. In the very near future, novel personalized services will emerge, driven by new user expectations. The virtualization of human emotions, senses, and thoughts, i.e., Human Bond Communications (HBC), reflect this communication paradigm shift. This revolutionary and divergent approach represents a holistic system capable of describing and transmitting the features of an object in a way that humans perceives them. A physical object, thanks to the Human Bond Communications, can be modelled and digitalized, incorporating all human senses in the domain of information. The information associated to a physical object can be then transmitted through an underlying communication platform. Another related and important topic of HBC is the security and privacy of personal data. This Special Issue focuses on “Human Bond Communication” related topics, aiming to provide a comprehensive survey of the current research works in this field.

Prof. Dr. Enrico Del Re
Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Mucchi
Dr. Simone Morosi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Digital human senses
  • Smart human-sense transductors
  • Human-to-machine and HBC interfaces
  • HBC sensors and replicators
  • Wireless sensors and actuators
  • Body area networks
  • Security and privacy of personal data
  • Augmentation of senses
  • Wearable devices and sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
An Autonomous Wireless Health Monitoring System Based on Heartbeat and Accelerometer Sensors
J. Sens. Actuator Netw. 2019, 8(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/jsan8030039 - 13 Jul 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Falls are a main cause of injury for patients with certain diseases. Patients who wear health monitoring systems can go about daily activities without limitations, thereby enhancing their quality of life. In this paper, patient falls and heart rate were accurately detected and [...] Read more.
Falls are a main cause of injury for patients with certain diseases. Patients who wear health monitoring systems can go about daily activities without limitations, thereby enhancing their quality of life. In this paper, patient falls and heart rate were accurately detected and measured using two proposed algorithms. The first algorithm, abnormal heart rate detection (AHRD), improves patient heart rate measurement accuracy and distinguishes between normal and abnormal heart rate functions. The second algorithm, TB-AIC, combines an acceleration threshold and monitoring of patient activity/inactivity functions to accurately detect patient falls. The two algorithms were practically implemented in a proposed autonomous wireless health monitoring system (AWHMS). The AWHMS was implemented based on a GSM module, GPS, microcontroller, heartbeat and accelerometer sensors, and a smartphone. The measurement accuracy of the recorded heart rate was evaluated based on the mean absolute error, Bland–Altman plots, and correlation coefficients. Fourteen types of patient activities were considered (seven types of falling and seven types of daily activities) to determine the fall detection accuracy. The results indicate that the proposed AWHMS succeeded in monitoring the patient’s vital signs, with heart rate measurement and fall detection accuracies of 98.75% and 99.11%, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of the fall detection algorithm (both 99.12%) were explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Wireless Systems for Human Bond Communications)
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Open AccessArticle
A System for Monitoring Breathing Activity Using an Ultrasonic Radar Detection with Low Power Consumption
J. Sens. Actuator Netw. 2019, 8(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/jsan8020032 - 24 May 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Continuous monitoring of breathing activity plays a major role in detecting and classifying a breathing abnormality. This work aims to facilitate detection of abnormal breathing syndromes, including tachypnea, bradypnea, central apnea, and irregular breathing by tracking of thorax movement resulting from respiratory rhythms [...] Read more.
Continuous monitoring of breathing activity plays a major role in detecting and classifying a breathing abnormality. This work aims to facilitate detection of abnormal breathing syndromes, including tachypnea, bradypnea, central apnea, and irregular breathing by tracking of thorax movement resulting from respiratory rhythms based on ultrasonic radar detection. This paper proposes a non-contact, non-invasive, low cost, low power consumption, portable, and precise system for simultaneous monitoring of normal and abnormal breathing activity in real-time using an ultrasonic PING sensor and microcontroller PIC18F452. Moreover, the obtained abnormal breathing syndrome is reported to the concerned physician’s mobile telephone through a global system for mobile communication (GSM) modem to handle the case depending on the patient’s emergency condition. In addition, the power consumption of the proposed monitoring system is reduced via a duty cycle using an energy-efficient sleep/wake scheme. Experiments were conducted on 12 participants without any physical contact at different distances of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m and the breathing rates measured with the proposed system were then compared with those measured by a piezo respiratory belt transducer. The experimental results illustrate the feasibility of the proposed system to extract breathing rate and detect the related abnormal breathing syndromes with a high degree of agreement, strong correlation coefficient, and low error ratio. The results also showed that the total current consumption of the proposed monitoring system based on the sleep/wake scheme was 6.936 mA compared to 321.75 mA when the traditional operation was used instead. Consequently, this led to a 97.8% of power savings and extended the battery life time from 8 h to approximately 370 h. The proposed monitoring system could be used in both clinical and home settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Wireless Systems for Human Bond Communications)
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