Special Issue "Non Coding RNAs in the Cardiovascular System"

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Diego Franco Jaime

Departamento de Biología Experimental B3-362, Universidad de Jaén, Jaen, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cardiovascular development; atrial fibrillation; gene regulation; post-transcriptional regulation; non-coding RNAs; microRNAs
Assistant Guest Editor
Dr. Estefanía Lozano-Velasco

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cardiovascular development; atrial fibrillation; gene regulation; post-transcriptional regulation; non-coding RNAs; microRNAs; chromatin remodeling
Assistant Guest Editor
Dr. Fernando Bonet

Stem Cells and Development. CEDOC-Centro de Estudios de Doenças Crónicas. NOVA Medical School / Faculdade de Ciências Médicas. Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cardiovascular development; coronary vasculature; angiogenesis; gene regulation; post-transcriptional regulation; non-coding RNAs; microRNAs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

JCDD is launching a Special Issue on “Non-Coding RNAs in the Cardiovascular System”. Over the last decades, we have witnessed a tremendous effort to understand the gene regulatory mechanisms underlying cardiovascular development and hence disease. Multiple growth factors and transcription factors have been identified as playing a pivotal role in the heart and vasculature formation, leading to the definition of distinct gene regulatory networks. Recently, a novel layer of complexity has emerged given that the vast majority of the genome is transcribed into non-coding RNAs and much evidence demonstrated a key regulatory role for these molecules. Short and long non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed during embryogenesis as well as in adulthood where they can represent novel biomarkers for distinct pathological conditions, including therein the cardiovascular system. The functional contribution of these ncRNAs, particularly microRNAs and lncRNAs, has emerged in cardiovascular development and disease. This Special Issue aims to cover studies on the functional role of non-coding RNAs in the cardiovascular system, spanning from the early stages of development to the adult heart, as well as in congenital and acquired cardiovascular physiopathological conditions.

Prof. Dr. Diego Franco
Dr. Estefanía Lozano-Velasco
Dr. Fernando Bonet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular development
  • Gene regulatory mechanisms
  • Post-transcriptional regulation
  • microRNAs

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
The Functions of Long Non-Coding RNA during Embryonic Cardiovascular Development and Its Potential for Diagnosis and Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2019, 6(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd6020021
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
Congenital heart disease (CHD) arises due to errors during the embryonic development of the heart, a highly regulated process involving an interplay between cell-intrinsic transcription factor expression and intercellular signalling mediated by morphogens. Emerging evidence indicates that expression of these protein-coding genes is [...] Read more.
Congenital heart disease (CHD) arises due to errors during the embryonic development of the heart, a highly regulated process involving an interplay between cell-intrinsic transcription factor expression and intercellular signalling mediated by morphogens. Emerging evidence indicates that expression of these protein-coding genes is controlled by a plethora of previously unappreciated non-coding RNAs operating in complex feedback-control circuits. In this review, we consider the contribution of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) to embryonic cardiovascular development before discussing applications to CHD diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss the process of lineage restriction during cardiovascular progenitor cell differentiation, as well as the subsequent patterning of the cardiogenic progenitor fields, taking as an example the regulation of NODAL signalling in left-right patterning of the heart. lncRNA are a highly versatile group. Nuclear lncRNA can target specific genomic sequences and recruit chromatin remodelling complexes. Some nuclear lncRNA are transcribed from enhancers and regulate chromatin looping. Cytoplasmic lncRNA act as endogenous competitors for micro RNA, as well as binding and sequestering signalling proteins. We discuss features of lncRNA that limit their study by conventional methodology and suggest solutions to these problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non Coding RNAs in the Cardiovascular System)
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Open AccessReview
The Role of Non-Coding RNA in Congenital Heart Diseases
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2019, 6(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd6020015
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 24 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (899 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cardiovascular development is a complex developmental process starting with the formation of an early straight heart tube, followed by a rightward looping and the configuration of atrial and ventricular chambers. The subsequent step allows the separation of these cardiac chambers leading to the [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular development is a complex developmental process starting with the formation of an early straight heart tube, followed by a rightward looping and the configuration of atrial and ventricular chambers. The subsequent step allows the separation of these cardiac chambers leading to the formation of a four-chambered organ. Impairment in any of these developmental processes invariably leads to cardiac defects. Importantly, our understanding of the developmental defects causing cardiac congenital heart diseases has largely increased over the last decades. The advent of the molecular era allowed to bridge morphogenetic with genetic defects and therefore our current understanding of the transcriptional regulation of cardiac morphogenesis has enormously increased. Moreover, the impact of environmental agents to genetic cascades has been demonstrated as well as of novel genomic mechanisms modulating gene regulation such as post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Among post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, non-coding RNAs, including therein microRNAs and lncRNAs, are emerging to play pivotal roles. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the functional role of non-coding RNAs in distinct congenital heart diseases, with particular emphasis on microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non Coding RNAs in the Cardiovascular System)
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Figure 1

Open AccessReview
A Hearty Dose of Noncoding RNAs: The Imprinted DLK1-DIO3 Locus in Cardiac Development and Disease
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2018, 5(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd5030037
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1201 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 genomic region harbors a noncoding RNA cluster encoding over fifty microRNAs (miRNAs), three long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and a small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) gene array. These distinct noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are thought to arise from a single polycistronic transcript that [...] Read more.
The imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 genomic region harbors a noncoding RNA cluster encoding over fifty microRNAs (miRNAs), three long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and a small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) gene array. These distinct noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are thought to arise from a single polycistronic transcript that is subsequently processed into individual ncRNAs, each with important roles in diverse cellular contexts. Considering these ncRNAs are derived from a polycistron, it is possible that some coordinately regulate discrete biological processes in the heart. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of Dlk1-Dio3 miRNAs and lncRNAs, as they are currently understood in the cellular and organ-level context of the cardiovascular system. Highlighted are expression profiles, mechanistic contributions, and functional roles of these ncRNAs in heart development and disease. Notably, a number of these ncRNAs are implicated in processes often perturbed in heart disease, including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and fibrosis. However, most literature falls short of characterizing precise mechanisms for many of these ncRNAs, warranting further investigation. Taken together, the Dlk1-Dio3 locus represents a largely unexplored noncoding regulator of cardiac homeostasis, harboring numerous ncRNAs that may serve as therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non Coding RNAs in the Cardiovascular System)
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J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. EISSN 2308-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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