Special Issue "Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Steven Furnell
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Security, Communications and Network Research, Plymouth University, UK
Interests: IT security; security management and culture, cybercrime, usability of security and privacy technologies, mobile security, technologies for user authentication and intrusion detection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sokratis Katsikas
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Security and Communication Technology, Norwegian University of Science Technology (NTNU), P.O. Box 191, Gjøvik N-2802, Norway
Interests: information security and cybersecurity management and governance; critical infrastructure cybersecurity; information and communication systems security
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Costas Lambrinoudakis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Digital Systems, University of Piraeus, Greece
Interests: information and communication systems security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New computing paradigms, such as cloud computing, big data and the Internet of Things open new horizons for businesses by making the provision of high quality services all over the world possible. All these developments ultimately aim at improving our quality of life, at making it easier to generate wealth, and at ensuring that businesses remain competitive in the global marketplace. These developments have been made possible in a remarkably short time span, by virtue of the fact that information and communication technologies move fast; sometimes they move too fast for society and for governments. This explains why such rapid technological evolutions cannot be problem-free. In the domain of digital businesses, concerns are raised regarding the lack of trust in electronic procedures and the extent to which information security and user privacy can be ensured.

The Special Issue on “Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business” aims to provide an international forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange information regarding advancements in the state of the art and practice of trust, security and privacy in digital business. It contains expanded versions of selected papers presented in the 13th International Conference on Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business (TrustBus’16), which was held in Porto, Portugal on 7–8 September 2016.

Prof. Steven Furnell
Prof. Sokratis K. Katsikas
Assoc. Prof. Costas Lambrinoudakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Digital business
  • Trust
  • Privacy
  • Security

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Framework for Systematic Refinement of Trustworthiness Requirements
Information 2017, 8(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/info8020046 - 20 Apr 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
The trustworthiness of systems that support complex collaborative business processes is an emergent property. In order to address users’ trust concerns, trustworthiness requirements of software systems must be elicited and satisfied. The aim of this paper is to address the gap that exists [...] Read more.
The trustworthiness of systems that support complex collaborative business processes is an emergent property. In order to address users’ trust concerns, trustworthiness requirements of software systems must be elicited and satisfied. The aim of this paper is to address the gap that exists between end-users’ trust concerns and the lack of implementation of proper trustworthiness requirements. New technologies like cloud computing bring new capabilities for hosting and offering complex collaborative business operations. However, these advances might bring undesirable side effects, e.g., introducing new vulnerabilities and threats caused by collaboration and data exchange over the Internet. Hence, users become more concerned about trust. Trust is subjective; trustworthiness requirements for addressing trust concerns are difficult to elicit, especially if there are different parties involved in the business process. We propose a user-centered trustworthiness requirement analysis and modeling framework. We integrate the subjective trust concerns into goal models and embed them into business process models as objective trustworthiness requirements. Business process model and notation is extended to enable modeling trustworthiness requirements. This paper focuses on the challenges of elicitation, refinement and modeling trustworthiness requirements. An application example from the healthcare domain is used to demonstrate our approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business)
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Open AccessArticle
Computer-Aided Identification and Validation of Intervenability Requirements
Information 2017, 8(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/info8010030 - 09 Mar 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
Privacy as a software quality is becoming more important these days and should not be underestimated during the development of software that processes personal data. The privacy goal of intervenability, in contrast to unlinkability (including anonymity and pseudonymity), has so far received little [...] Read more.
Privacy as a software quality is becoming more important these days and should not be underestimated during the development of software that processes personal data. The privacy goal of intervenability, in contrast to unlinkability (including anonymity and pseudonymity), has so far received little attention in research. Intervenability aims for the empowerment of end-users by keeping their personal data and how it is processed by the software system under their control. Several surveys have pointed out that the lack of intervenability options is a central privacy concern of end-users. In this paper, we systematically assess the privacy goal of intervenability and set up a software requirements taxonomy that relates the identified intervenability requirements with a taxonomy of transparency requirements. Furthermore, we provide a tool-supported method to identify intervenability requirements from the functional requirements of a software system. This tool-supported method provides the means to elicit and validate intervenability requirements in a computer-aided way. Our combined taxonomy of intervenability and transparency requirements gives a detailed view on the privacy goal of intervenability and its relation to transparency. We validated the completeness of our taxonomy by comparing it to the relevant literature that we derived based on a systematic literature review. The proposed method for the identification of intervenability requirements shall support requirements engineers to elicit and document intervenability requirements in compliance with the EU General Data Protection Regulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business)
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