Special Issue "New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020) | Viewed by 10247

Special Issue Editors

Assist. Prof. Marie Walsh
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Limerick Institute of Technology, Ireland
Interests: chemistry; pharmaceutical science; science education; ICT and science teaching
Dr. Martin Musumeci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Faculty of Education, University of Malta, Malta
Interests: chemistry education; science education; initial teacher education; curriculum development; educational assessment; attitudes towards science and subject choice
Dr. Nikolaos Fotou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lincoln University, School of, United Kingdom
Interests: nature of students’ knowledge; misconceptions; analogical reasoning; self-generation of analogies; use of ICT in science and mathematics classrooms; role and effectiveness of practical work in secondary and tertiary science education; research in initial teacher education; peer-mentoring; special education needs in science education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 9th edition of the New Perspectives in Science Education Conference will take place in Florence, Italy, on 19–20 March 2020.

The objective of the Conference is to promote transnational cooperation and share good practice in the field of innovation for science education. In particular, spotlight will be given to educational strategies, assessment, professional development, and students’ motivation. The main research fields are mathematics, chemistry, physics, environment, biomedics, robotics and engineering, and STEM.

The New Perspectives in Science Education Conference is also an excellent opportunity for the presentation of previous and current projects in the science field. Teachers, researchers, practitioners and project managers from all over the world are invited to take part in the Conference.

Authors willing to submit an abstract should send an email to Pixel, at [email protected], attaching the abstract written using the provided template available at https://conference.pixel-online.net/NPSE/templates.php, or create a new account on the conference website homepage, uploading their abstract by following the guidelines provided. The abstract’s official language is English, its length must not exceed 450 words, and keywords and references must be included.

The abstracts and papers submitted will be peer-reviewed by the scientific committee based on originality, technical quality, and presentation. All accepted papers will be included in the Conference Proceedings published by the Italian publisher “Filodiritto Editore” with ISBN, ISSN, DOI (Digital Object Identifier) and ISPN (International Standard Proceedings Number) code by Cambridge UK International Academics.

Among the accepted papers, up to fifteen best papers will be selected, and authors will be requested to send an extended version of their articles. Authors interested in extending their conference papers must be aware that the final submitted manuscript must provide a minimum of 50% new content and not exceed 30% copy/paste from the proceedings paper.

Each paper will be blind-reviewed by MDPI academic editors. Accepted papers will be published in the “Special Issues” section at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/information/special_issues, indexed by Ei Compendex, Scopus (Elsevier), Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI—Web of Science).

The Conference Scientific Committee

Prof. Marie Walsh
Dr. Martin Musumeci
Dr. Nikolaos Fotou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomedical science education
  • Chemistry education
  • Curriculum development
  • Educational strategies
  • Enhancing students’ motivation
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Pre-service teacher professional development
  • Preschool and primary education
  • Science and engineering
  • Science and environment
  • Science and society
  • Science education and special needs
  • STEM Education
  • Student assessment
  • Training of science teachers

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
An Interdisciplinary Scientific and Mathematic Education, Addressing Relevant Social Problems Such as Sexist Hate Speech
Information 2020, 11(12), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11120543 - 25 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1695
Abstract
The intention of this article is to share research taken from the initial training of secondary education pre-service teachers, in which college professors from mathematics and social sciences education participate. There are numerous studies regarding curriculum integration. However, there is insufficient research that [...] Read more.
The intention of this article is to share research taken from the initial training of secondary education pre-service teachers, in which college professors from mathematics and social sciences education participate. There are numerous studies regarding curriculum integration. However, there is insufficient research that offers insight into how different forms of disciplinary thought may come together in the design and development in practice for an educational purpose. The research professors carried out a qualitative investigation, working with two pre-service teacher groups from the fields of mathematics and social sciences. We used a validated research instrument to analyze how interdisciplinary educational proposals are developed, and how said proposals can be used to understand our social reality. Through an integrated project, pre-service teachers addressed sexist hate speech taken from different contexts. They designed didactic proposals, with mathematical contents, which allow high school students to argue with data and create counter-narratives, which softened or eliminated the sexist hate speech Among the conclusions, we may emphasize the value of pre-service teachers identifying their strengths in order to use the mathematical and social thought processes in an autonomous and creative way, thereby developing the instrumental, functional, and formative character in mathematics education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020)
Article
Effects of Various Behaviours in the Break Times between Learning
Information 2020, 11(9), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11090407 - 21 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1681
Abstract
E-learning provides users with the experience of learning at their own pace, without being restricted by time and place. Learners tend to get tired gradually during learning, and therefore, it is important to have breaks between studies to maintain learning performance. Furthermore, the [...] Read more.
E-learning provides users with the experience of learning at their own pace, without being restricted by time and place. Learners tend to get tired gradually during learning, and therefore, it is important to have breaks between studies to maintain learning performance. Furthermore, the break time has to be effective so that learners can refresh. This study compares three types of breaks: quiet, active, and communication breaks. In the experiment, university students in their twenties are asked to solve as many mathematical calculation problems as possible for 15 min. The experiment comprises three learning sessions and two three-minute breaks between them. Learners are assigned one of the three types of breaks to refresh themselves. The effect of those resting behaviours on learning is examined, and the results are evaluated with regard to the accuracy of their calculations and their answering time. The effects of these behaviours will be discussed based on the experimental results and the questionnaire. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020)
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Article
The Effectiveness of a Must-Have Practical Work in Tertiary Life Science Education
Information 2020, 11(9), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11090401 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1946
Abstract
The teaching of sciences has long been associated with practical work; an instructional tool that is believed to be effective in terms of both promoting learning as well as making the teaching of sciences enjoyable. However, empirical evidence on its effectiveness as a [...] Read more.
The teaching of sciences has long been associated with practical work; an instructional tool that is believed to be effective in terms of both promoting learning as well as making the teaching of sciences enjoyable. However, empirical evidence on its effectiveness as a teaching method and whether it has any affective value for undergraduates is still lacking, when it has been deemed as one of the costliest aspects of science education. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a mixed-methods case study conducted at a British university to examine the perceived aims of practical work as well as the effectiveness of practical work on conceptual understanding and motivating undergraduates according to the academic staff of a life sciences department. For the qualitative data presented here a questionnaire was administered to the academic staff who, along with Year 1 and Year 2 undergraduates, were interviewed and also observed during practical work classes. The preliminary findings showed that the perceived aims of practical work by the academic staff vary across years, while the observations revealed two types of lessons in which the importance of providing theoretical scaffolds during experiments so as to help undergraduates in linking concepts and theories with observables was prominent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020)
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Article
The Transformativity of the Flipped Inclusion Model, between Anthropocentric Ergonomics of Social Capital, and Ecological-Systemic Empowerment
Information 2020, 11(8), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11080398 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2925
Abstract
The use of information age technology favors pervasive communication exchanges and complex phenomenologies, which affect the production of knowledge and the permanent transformation of personalities and contexts, not always with a view to prosocial empowerment of differences. From the analysis of the liquid [...] Read more.
The use of information age technology favors pervasive communication exchanges and complex phenomenologies, which affect the production of knowledge and the permanent transformation of personalities and contexts, not always with a view to prosocial empowerment of differences. From the analysis of the liquid socio–psycho–educational frames explored in the research activated at the University of Salerno, the permanent need for a widespread media education emerges, to be rooted in a lifelong learning vision to achieve systemic inclusiveness. This is the basis of the epistemology of the existential design model Flipped Inclusion, promoted and tested at the University of Salerno, whose complex idiomatic phrase constitutes the integrated and complex synthesis of the multi-perspective and multimodal approach pursued by the model. In the exploratory–descriptive–transformative research underway since 2014, through blended learning, complex blended learning and with formal, non-formal and informal contexts, the design–organizational, algorithmic–computational architecture of flipped inclusion is experimented upon. The trend of data since 2014 confirms the educational value of the model, due to the positive impact relating to inclusiveness on personal styles and social contexts, hence the intention to continue research on larger samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020)
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Article
Challenges Faced by Maltese Students Studying Advanced Level Physics
Information 2020, 11(8), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11080397 - 17 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1451
Abstract
One of the aims of the Secondary Education Certificate (SEC) Physics syllabus is “to provide the basis for further study of the subject”. This research determined the extent to which the syllabus is fulfilling this aim. In this study, seven post-secondary Physics teachers [...] Read more.
One of the aims of the Secondary Education Certificate (SEC) Physics syllabus is “to provide the basis for further study of the subject”. This research determined the extent to which the syllabus is fulfilling this aim. In this study, seven post-secondary Physics teachers participated in semi-structured interviews and 200 students provided feedback to a questionnaire. Areas in which the SEC Physics syllabus is not preparing students well enough to further their studies in the subject were identified and suggestions were given to help improve the situation. This study confirmed that there is an academic disparity between SEC and Advanced Matriculation (AM) Physics. This disparity is highlighted in the problem-solving skills necessary for success at both levels, mathematical physics, language and in concepts which are highly abstract. The study also confirmed that there is a large amount of rote learning involved in SEC level Physics. As a result, students learn superficially and struggle to grasp the complex concepts taught in A-level Physics. In order to prepare students better for post-secondary education, SEC Physics students should be asked to answer questions which involve higher levels of thinking and to solve more complex mathematical problems. Furthermore, more frequent practical sessions, a greater degree of student involvement and a greater emphasis on the link between theoretical ideas and practical work is also recommended. A shift of emphasis is required from teaching content to teaching higher order thinking skills. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Science Education—NPSE 2020)
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