Special Issue "Psychosocial Treatments in Routine Mental Health Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Joan Trujols
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Addictive Behaviors Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain
2. Mental Health Networking Biomedical Research Centre (CIBERSAM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: mental health; psychological assessment; cognitive-behavioral therapy; psychosocial well-being; patient-centered research; patient reported outcome measure (PROM); patient and public involvement (PPI); personomics; addictive disorders
Dr. Maria J. Portella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Group of Research on Psychiatric Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Biomedical Research Sant Pau (IIB Sant Pau), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
2. Mental Health Networking Biomedical Research Centre (CIBERSAM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: mental health; neuropsychology; neuroscience; cognitive remediation; psychosocial functioning; affective disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the psychosocial treatments that are used routinely in real-world clinical settings. The term psychosocial intervention is referred in its broadest sense to include illness and medication management, health promotion, and psychological and social interventions.

There is a growing consensus on a broad range of evidence-based psychosocial interventions, but unfortunately several of them are not routinely implemented in mental health care. Yet, and more importantly, there is a lack of outcome studies that evaluate the real-world implementation and effectiveness of such therapeutic approaches. Therefore, this Special Issue is devoted to gather evidence on experiences upon implementing psychosocial interventions. The resulting issue shall include manuscripts mirroring the potential of interconnecting studies across diagnoses; those from an interdisciplinary perspective within the variety of mental health professionals; those tapping into the diversity of clinical settings; as well as, across countries experiences.

In this Special Issue, submission of original research articles, clinical practice and methodological innovations, and theoretical manuscripts upon barriers and supportive factors involved in implementing evidence-based psychosocial interventions are welcome.

Dr. Joan Trujols
Dr. Maria J. Portella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Psychological Interventions
  • Social Interventions
  • Recovery-oriented Services
  • Psychoeducation
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • Cognitive Remediation
  • Psychosocial Management of Medical Conditions
  • Psychological Well-being
  • Outcome Assessment
  • Clinical Significance

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Real-World Study of the Association between a Brief Group Psychoeducation and the Course of Bipolar Disorder
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 5019; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18095019 - 10 May 2021
Viewed by 429
Abstract
Although pharmacotherapy is considered the first-line treatment for bipolar disorders (BD), adjunctive psychoeducation has proven its effectiveness in improving self-management of the disease and reducing relapse rates. Few studies have evaluated the effect of brief group psychoeducation on pragmatic variables, such as the [...] Read more.
Although pharmacotherapy is considered the first-line treatment for bipolar disorders (BD), adjunctive psychoeducation has proven its effectiveness in improving self-management of the disease and reducing relapse rates. Few studies have evaluated the effect of brief group psychoeducation on pragmatic variables, such as the number of hospitalizations. The aim of the present study was to assess the mid-term effect of a four-session group psychoeducation on course-related variables in BD. Thirty-two individuals with BD were included in the study. Sixteen were exposed to psychoeducation and were matched to sixteen nonexposed individuals who received their usual treatment. Both groups were compared on insight, treatment adherence, change in the number of hospitalizations and visits to the emergency services, occurrence rate after intervention, and time to the first psychiatric hospitalization and the first urgent attendance. There was a significant reduction in the mean number of hospitalizations and urgent attendances in the exposed group in comparison to the nonexposed group. The first urgent attendance was significantly sooner in the nonexposed cohort. There were no differences between groups in any of the other variables. This intervention has shown benefits for pragmatic variables of the disease course and may be a feasible and cost-effective intervention to routinely implement in the management of BD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Treatments in Routine Mental Health Care)
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Article
A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Caregiver-Facilitated Problem-Solving Based Self-Learning Program for Family Carers of People with Early Psychosis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249343 - 14 Dec 2020
Viewed by 704
Abstract
Facilitated self-help and problem-solving strategies can empower and support family carers to cope with caregiving for people with severe mental illnesses. This single-blind multi-site randomised controlled trial examined the effects of a five-month family-facilitated problem-solving based self-learning program (PBSP in addition to usual [...] Read more.
Facilitated self-help and problem-solving strategies can empower and support family carers to cope with caregiving for people with severe mental illnesses. This single-blind multi-site randomised controlled trial examined the effects of a five-month family-facilitated problem-solving based self-learning program (PBSP in addition to usual care), versus a family psychoeducation group program and usual psychiatric care only in recent-onset psychosis, with a six-month follow-up. In each of three study sites (integrated community centres for mental wellness), 114 people with early psychosis (≤5 years illness onset) and their family carers were randomly selected and allocated to one of three study groups (n = 38). Caregiving burden (primary outcome) and patients’ and carers’ health conditions were assessed at recruitment, and one-month and six-months post-intervention. Overall, 106 (94.7%) participants completed the assigned intervention and ≥1 post-test. Generalised estimating equations and subsequent contrast tests indicated that the PBSP participants showed significantly greater improvements in carers’ burden, caregiving experiences and problem-solving ability, and patients’ psychotic symptoms, recovery, and duration of re-hospitalisations over the six-month follow-up, compared with the other two groups (moderate to large effect size, η2 = 0.12–0.24). Family-assisted problem-solving based self-learning programs were found to be effective to improve both psychotic patients’ and their carers’ psychosocial health over a medium term, thus reducing patients’ risk of relapse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Treatments in Routine Mental Health Care)
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Article
A Pilot Study of a Psychoeducational Group Intervention Delivered at Asylum Accommodation Centers—A Mixed Methods Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8953; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238953 - 01 Dec 2020
Viewed by 586
Abstract
Asylum seekers suffer high levels of distress but have restricted access to mental health care. This paper constitutes an evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention, called AMIN, which was provided at two asylum accommodation centers in Sweden. A mixed-methods approach was used. To [...] Read more.
Asylum seekers suffer high levels of distress but have restricted access to mental health care. This paper constitutes an evaluation of a psycho-educational group intervention, called AMIN, which was provided at two asylum accommodation centers in Sweden. A mixed-methods approach was used. To assess potential effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility, quantitative outcome measures were combined with qualitative information from interviews with both intervention participants and staff providing the intervention. Potential effectiveness in reducing symptoms of distress and insomnia and in increasing physical quality of life was found, even though the intervention participants suffered from more severe distress than expected. In general, the intervention seemed to be acceptable to both participants and staff, with concrete strategies seeming more meaningful than abstract psychological techniques. Finally, regardless of the asylum process itself being a complicating factor, the intervention seemed feasible to deliver to individuals with different backgrounds and conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that some sessions may need further elaboration, but also that the transition to a randomized control trial is reasonable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Treatments in Routine Mental Health Care)

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Study Protocol
Improving Depressive Symptoms through Personalised Exercise and Activation (IDEA): Study Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6306; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126306 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 404
Abstract
Individuals who suffer from depressive symptoms experience a substantial impact on psychosocial functioning, physical health, mortality, and quality of life. In the search for therapeutic strategies, exercise has been found to play a relevant part in its treatment. However, the promotion of exercise [...] Read more.
Individuals who suffer from depressive symptoms experience a substantial impact on psychosocial functioning, physical health, mortality, and quality of life. In the search for therapeutic strategies, exercise has been found to play a relevant part in its treatment. However, the promotion of exercise entails adherence difficulties that arose out of the tendency towards sedentarism led by symptomatology. Personalised exercise plans on top of usual care have the potential to enhance behavioural changes and mental health. The present study aims at evaluating the changes in functioning deriving from a blended intervention merging a psychological intervention with a personalised exercise programme based on medical assessment. We will conduct a three-arm randomised controlled trial in which 172 participants suffering from mild–moderate depressive symptoms will be allocated to Intervention A (personalised exercise group programme + app with motivational messages), B (personalised exercise group programme + app with no motivational messages) or control group (app with no motivational messages). Data regarding global functioning, well-being, symptoms, physical activity, and exercise capacity will be collected at baseline, 4, 12, and 36 weeks. The results of this trial will provide information about whether this physical activity support programme may be efficient for improving mental and physical health outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04857944 (accessed on 15 April 2021). Registered April 2021. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Treatments in Routine Mental Health Care)
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