Special Issue "Physical Activity and Occupational Health in a 24/7 Perspective"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. David M. Hallman
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, Gävle 801 76, Sweden
Interests: occupational health; physical activity; musculoskeletal pain
Prof. Dr. Svend Erik Mathiassen
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, Gävle 801 76, Sweden
Interests: occupational health; physical work load; exposure assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will focus on occupational physical activity, viewed as an integrated part of the activity pattern of the whole day, including leisure and sleep time.

Daily physical activity is important for reducing health risks and maintaining good health, but research integrating physical activity at work into an ‘around-the-clock’ perspective including leisure and sleep is sparse. This leaves both organizations and workers with limited guidance on how to form health-promoting jobs adapted both to the organizational context and to the personal traits of the worker, such as age, gender, and socioeconomic status. This Special Issue collects studies addressing physical activity and inactivity at work in the context of how it contributes to occupational health from a ‘holistic’ 24/7 perspective.

Thus, we welcome high-quality papers on exposures to and health effects of physical activity at work from a 24/7 perspective. In particular, we would appreciate studies addressing compositions of time spent in various activities at and outside work and other studies that can contribute to a better understanding of health beyond the effects of single behaviors in only one domain.

Dr. David M. Hallman
Prof. Dr. Svend Erik Mathiassen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Occupational health
  • Physical activity
  • Sedentary behavior
  • Temporal patterns
  • Compositional data

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Natural Patterns of Sitting, Standing and Stepping During and Outside Work—Differences between Habitual Users and Non-Users of Sit–Stand Workstations
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4075; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114075 - 08 Jun 2020
Abstract
Sit–stand workstations have shown to reduce sitting time in office workers on a group level. However, movement behaviour patterns might differ between subgroups of workers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine sitting, standing and stepping outcomes between habitual users and [...] Read more.
Sit–stand workstations have shown to reduce sitting time in office workers on a group level. However, movement behaviour patterns might differ between subgroups of workers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine sitting, standing and stepping outcomes between habitual users and non-users of sit–stand workstations. From an international office population based in the Netherlands, 24 users and 25 non-users of sit–stand workstations were included (all had long-term access to these workstations). Using the ActivPAL, sitting, standing and stepping were objectively measured during and outside working hours. Differences in outcomes between users and non-users were analysed using linear regression. During working hours, users sat less (−1.64; 95% IC= −2.27–−1.01 h/8 h workday) and stood more (1.51; 95% IC= 0.92–2.10 h/8 h workday) than non-users. Attenuated but similar differences were also found for total sitting time over the whole week. Furthermore, time in static standing bouts was relatively high for users during working hours (median= 0.56; IQR = 0.19−1.08 h/8 h workday). During non-working hours on workdays and during non-working days, no differences were found between users and non-users. During working hours, habitual users of their sit–stand workstation sat substantially less and stood proportionally more than non-users. No differences were observed outside working hours, leading to attenuated but similar differences in total sitting and standing time between users and non-users for total days. This indicated that the users of sit–stand workstations reduced their sitting time at work, but this seemed not to be accompanied by major carry-over or compensatory effects outside working hours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Occupational Health in a 24/7 Perspective)
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