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Special Issue "Mental Fatigue in Sport"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2023 | Viewed by 5202

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tomás García Calvo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10071 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: mental fatigue; sport psychology; soccer; team cohesion; leadership
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Inmaculada González Ponce
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, University of Extremadura, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: mental fatigue; sport psychology; group processes

Special Issue Information

There is a growing body of literature that recognizes the role of mental fatigue in sport performance. Several studies provide preliminary evidence that the former impairs the latter. However, different experts highlight the fact that this topic needs a large body of studies in ecological contexts, especially to determine (i) the mental fatigue produced by participation in real competitions and (ii) how coaches can manipulate mental fatigue through training interventions. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to collect information on the effects of mental load and fatigue on applied contexts.

This Special Issue cordially invites experts involved in different sports to submit original research with data about the effects of real competitions or training interventions on mental fatigue, to increase the knowledge about mental fatigue in sport ecological conditions.

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce a new Special Issue titled “Mental Fatigue in Sport” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. As you know based on your previous highlighted contributions to the mental fatigue literature, this has become an important emerging topic in sport during the last few years. However, many studies are needed to enhance the applied knowledge of this topic.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to advance the applied knowledge about mental fatigue in sport contexts, through original research in real competitions or training tasks. This Special Issue will be useful for coaches and practitioners, because we are searching for information on the effects of different training strategies and competitions on mental fatigue, new instruments for quantifying mental fatigue in real time, the application of recovery strategies for mental fatigue during training or competitions, and the effects of different covariates such as mental toughness and motivation on mental fatigue, among other applied aspects.

This message has been sent to you because we consider you able to significantly increase the quality of this Special Issue through your knowledge and experience in this topic. 

Dr. Tomás García Calvo
Dr. Inmaculada González Ponce
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mental fatigue
  • Mental load
  • Cognitive performance
  • Emotional responses
  • Psychobiological changes
  • Behavioral responses
  • Biomarkers
  • Perceived exertion
  • Performance
  • Training load monitoring
  • Ecological dynamics framework

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
How Mentally Fatiguing Are Consecutive World Padel Tour Matches?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9059; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179059 - 27 Aug 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1176
Abstract
It is currently unknown whether mental fatigue occurs throughout a WPT competition and whether consecutive matches affect how mentally fatiguing a match is perceived to be. The objective was to quantify the effects of successive professional matches on mental fatigue. A total of [...] Read more.
It is currently unknown whether mental fatigue occurs throughout a WPT competition and whether consecutive matches affect how mentally fatiguing a match is perceived to be. The objective was to quantify the effects of successive professional matches on mental fatigue. A total of 14 professional players (9 males, Mage = 25, 5 females, Mage = 21) participated during qualified rounds of a WPT with three eliminatory matches: Match 1 (morning) and 2 (afternoon) on day 1 (n = 14), Match 3 (morning) on day 2 (n = 6). Mental fatigue and motivation, with scales, and reaction time, with a 3-min Psychomotor Vigilance Test, were measured at two time intervals (pre and post matches (<30 min)). To analyze the evolution of these variables, a two-way repeated measures MANOVA was performed. An increase in mental fatigue from pre- to post-matches was observed (p < 0.01), with an accumulation of mental fatigue between matches played on day 1 (p < 0.01), maximizing the mental fatigue perceived during Match 2. Padel matches impair motivation and reaction time (p = 0.04), without effects between successive matches, which reinforced the idea that mental fatigue may impair padel performance (i.e., reaction time). Coaches should use training interventions and recovery strategies to counteract/avoid the accumulation of mental fatigue during professional tournaments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Fatigue in Sport)
Article
Effects of Fatigue and Grit on Club Sports Coaches
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7414; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147414 - 11 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1236
Abstract
The objective of this research is to identify the level of general fatigue (FG), physical fatigue (FF) and concentration/motivation (C/M) in sports coaches. Two components of grit, consistency of interest (CI) and perseverance in effort (PE), are also assessed. The possible effects of [...] Read more.
The objective of this research is to identify the level of general fatigue (FG), physical fatigue (FF) and concentration/motivation (C/M) in sports coaches. Two components of grit, consistency of interest (CI) and perseverance in effort (PE), are also assessed. The possible effects of sex, age, marital status, employment contract, work dedication and grit on FG, FF and C/M in sports coaches are examined. This cross-sectional study analyses 335 sports club coaches (21.2% women, 78.8% male) with a mean age of 29.88 (SD = 9.97) years, at a significance level of p < 0.05 for all analyses. Different aspects of fatigue were determined using the Spanish translation of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20 (IMF-20). The Grit-S scale was used to measure the ability to persevere, have passion and commit. The results indicated that men scored higher in FF, C/M and PE, while women obtained higher values in FG and CI. Non-contract coaches had higher FG, CI and PE, while coaches with contracts scored higher on C/M and FF. In conclusion, coaches with higher CI had higher FG, and high levels of PE were associated with low FG levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Fatigue in Sport)

Other

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Systematic Review
Mental Load and Fatigue Assessment Instruments: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010419 - 31 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2102
Abstract
Mental load and fatigue are important causes of performance decreases and accidents in different activities. However, a robust systematic review, detailing the instruments used to quantify them, is currently lacking. The purpose of this study was to summarize and classify by derivations the [...] Read more.
Mental load and fatigue are important causes of performance decreases and accidents in different activities. However, a robust systematic review, detailing the instruments used to quantify them, is currently lacking. The purpose of this study was to summarize and classify by derivations the validated instruments used to quantify mental load and fatigue. The most representative electronic databases in the scope of this review, PubMed, WOS, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO (until September 2020) were searched for studies that included instruments to analyze mental load and fatigue. The quality of the selected studies was scored using a quality assessment checklist. A total of 40 papers were included. Most of the papers used subjective scales (75%) to quantify mental load and fatigue, with a small presence of behavioral (n = 5) and objective techniques (n = 5). Less is known about the analysis of mental load and fatigue using a combination of derivations. Despite the high cost and complexity of objective techniques, research that applies these measures is important for further analysis of brain processes in mental load and fatigue. The design of a battery of tests that include the three types of derivations also seems necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Fatigue in Sport)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The Effect of Surgical Mask Use in Physical Performance in Obese and Normoweight Participants
Authors: Vicente Javier Clemente-Suárez 1, 2
Affiliation: 1. Universidad Europea de Madrid. Faculty of Sport Sciences, Madrid, Spain; 2. Grupo de Investigación en Cultura, Educación y Sociedad. Universidad de la Costa, Barranquilla, Colombia.
Abstract: COVID-19 restrictions stipulated the mandatory use of surgical masks in outdoors and indoors physical activities. The physiological modification in normal ventilation present different impact in active population. The aim of the present research was to analyse the effect of surgical masks use in physical performance in obese and normoweight participants. Modifications in running time, blood lactate, blood glucose, blood oxygen saturation, subjective perceived stress, rating of perceived exertion, and heart rate variability were measured in a push-up test and in a 400 m maximal running tests with and without the use of surgical masks in a group of obese and normoweight physical activity participants. The use of surgical mask produced a decrease in performance of push up and 400 m tests in obese participants, but no in normoweight participants; an increased rated of perceived exertion of obese in push up and 400 m test and in normoweight 400 m test; a significantly lower blood oxygen saturation in push-up and 400 m tests only in normoweight; a decrease in jump performance in push-up and 400 m tests only in obese; and a higher sympathetic response in both test in the normoweight group.

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