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Second Edition: Healthcare Services and Epidemiology for Chronic Disease Management and Prevention

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 14573

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Group for Social and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: health care services; general practice; medicines use; intervention design; patient outcome measures; questionnaires; disease prevention; epidemiology; respiratory diseases; diabetes; chronic pain; vitamin D deficiency
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Guest Editor
Research Unit for Dietary Studies, The Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
Interests: disease prevention; epidemiology; register data; cohort studies; randomized controlled trials; bone health; obesity; cardiovascular diseases; children; nutrition; systematic reviews; meta-analyses and meta-regression analyses; GRADE

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the first edition’s success, we are organizing a second edition Special Issue on healthcare services research for chronic disease management, and on epidemiology for chronic disease prevention in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information about the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.  

While today’s situation with the COVID-19 virus demonstrates the rising health concerns related to global pandemics, concerns related to the worldwide rise in chronic diseases, alongside an aging population and steady changes in lifestyle, have been well known for quite a while. Chronic diseases are common, cause long-term health problems, require lifelong healthcare, and bear tremendous costs. To address the growing healthcare demands, new healthcare delivery models, often driven by developments in technology, are emerging, promising optimization of healthcare and minimization of healthcare costs. Simultaneously, public health efforts allocated to health promotion and disease prevention also lessen the chronic disease burden. Continuous and diverse research in chronic disease management and prevention is thus paramount to support further improvements in healthcare and advance our knowledge of disease prevention. This Special Issue aims to highlight problems and solutions of chronic disease management and prevention addressed and exemplified utilizing various quantitative research methods. 

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to healthcare services research for chronic disease management and epidemiology for chronic disease prevention. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Ramune Jacobsen
Dr. Mina Nicole Händel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthcare services
  • primary healthcare
  • disease management
  • health technologies
  • medicine use
  • rehabilitation
  • patient outcome measures
  • disease prevention
  • epidemiology
  • systematic reviews
  • meta-analyses
  • vitamin D deficiency
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • respiratory diseases
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • bone health
  • mental health

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 781 KiB  
Article
Detecting Medication Risks among People in Need of Care: Performance of Six Instruments
by Tobias Dreischulte, Linda Sanftenberg, Philipp Hennigs, Isabel Zöllinger, Rita Schwaiger, Caroline Floto, Maria Sebastiao, Thomas Kühlein, Dagmar Hindenburg, Ildikó Gagyor, Domenika Wildgruber, Anita Hausen, Christian Janke, Michael Hölscher, Daniel Teupser, Jochen Gensichen and on behalf of the BACOM Study Group
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032327 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1432
Abstract
Introduction: Numerous tools exist to detect potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) and potential prescribing omissions (PPO) in older people, but it remains unclear which tools may be most relevant in which setting. Objectives: This cross sectional study compares six validated tools in terms of [...] Read more.
Introduction: Numerous tools exist to detect potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) and potential prescribing omissions (PPO) in older people, but it remains unclear which tools may be most relevant in which setting. Objectives: This cross sectional study compares six validated tools in terms of PIM and PPO detection. Methods: We examined the PIM/PPO prevalence for all tools combined and the sensitivity of each tool. The pairwise agreement between tools was determined using Cohen’s Kappa. Results: We included 226 patients in need of care (median (IQR age 84 (80–89)). The overall PIM prevalence was 91.6 (95% CI, 87.2–94.9)% and the overall PPO prevalence was 63.7 (57.1–69.9%)%. The detected PIM prevalence ranged from 76.5%, for FORTA-C/D, to 6.6% for anticholinergic drugs (German-ACB). The PPO prevalences for START (63.7%) and FORTA-A (62.8%) were similar. The pairwise agreement between tools was poor to moderate. The sensitivity of PIM detection was highest for FORTA-C/D (55.1%), and increased to 79.2% when distinct items from STOPP were added. Conclusion: Using a single screening tool may not have sufficient sensitivity to detect PIMs and PPOs. Further research is required to optimize the composition of PIM and PPO tools in different settings. Full article
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14 pages, 1977 KiB  
Article
Community Pharmacy Staff’s Knowledge, Educational Needs, and Barriers Related to Counseling Cancer Patients and Cancer Survivors in Denmark
by Caroline Buhl, Nadia Lund Olsen, Lotte Stig Nørgaard, Linda Aagaard Thomsen and Ramune Jacobsen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2287; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032287 - 27 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1661
Abstract
Objective: The study aimed to determine Danish community pharmacy staff’s knowledge, educational needs, and barriers when communicating with cancer patients/survivors. Furthermore, the study investigated whether pharmacy staff was interested in participating in education about cancer. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among [...] Read more.
Objective: The study aimed to determine Danish community pharmacy staff’s knowledge, educational needs, and barriers when communicating with cancer patients/survivors. Furthermore, the study investigated whether pharmacy staff was interested in participating in education about cancer. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among community pharmacy staff (pharmacists and pharmaconomists) in Denmark. Descriptive and bivariate (t-test and chi-square) statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: In total, 134 staff members responded to the questionnaire. Their self-reported knowledge of cancer-related topics was between ‘very little knowledge’ and ‘some knowledge’. The most well-known topics concerned risk factors for cancer and side effects from cancer treatments. The importance of learning more about the same topics was rated between ‘important’ and ‘very important’. The largest barriers identified in counseling cancer patients/survivors were a lack of knowledge about cancer, a focus on healthcare problems other than cancer, and a traditional view of community pharmacies as a place to pick up medication. Pharmacy staff expressed interest in participating in educational programs about cancer treatment (91.0%), communication with cancer patients (88.1%), and late effects of cancer (93.3%). Conclusion: Community pharmacy staff show interest in participating in education regarding cancer, but need more knowledge to properly counsel cancer patients and survivors at the community pharmacies. This important barrier should be addressed in future educational programs for community pharmacy staff. Full article
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12 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
The Awareness and Adherence of the Valproate Pregnancy Prevention Program: A Questionnaire Survey among Healthcare Professionals, Pharmacists, and Patients in Denmark
by Nadia Maria Barbara Oliveri, Johanne Mølby Hansen, Anna Birna Almarsdóttir and Ramune Jacobsen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2215; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032215 - 26 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1561
Abstract
Background: The European Medicine Agency (EMA) provided additional recommendations regarding the use of valproate during pregnancy in 2018 by introducing a pregnancy prevention program (PPP). This study aimed to investigate the adherence and the impact of the PPP and the awareness of valproate [...] Read more.
Background: The European Medicine Agency (EMA) provided additional recommendations regarding the use of valproate during pregnancy in 2018 by introducing a pregnancy prevention program (PPP). This study aimed to investigate the adherence and the impact of the PPP and the awareness of valproate teratogenicity among Danish healthcare professionals (HCPs) and patients. Methods: As part of the EMA initiated multi-country survey, web-based questionnaires were distributed among Danish general practitioners (GPs), medical specialists, pharmacists, and patients. Results: A total of 90 prescribers, 98 pharmacists, and 103 patients were included in the study. Some 95.0% of the prescribers, 78.6% of the pharmacists, and 81.6% of the patients were aware of the teratogenic risks of valproate. The patient guide (27.8%), the HCP guide (23.3%), direct healthcare professional communication (23.3%), and the warning sign on the outer medication package (23.5%) were the most applied measures from the PPP. A total of 54.4% of the prescribers and 32.7% of the pharmacists informed patients about the importance of effective contraception during the use of valproate. Conclusion: The study showed that in Denmark HCPs and patients are highly aware of the teratogenic effects of valproate. However, adherence to and the impact of the measures included in the PPP were low. Full article
10 pages, 622 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Motor Difficulties Measured in the First Year of School among Children Who Attended Rural Outdoor or Urban Conventional Kindergartens
by Ina Olmer Specht, Sofus Christian Larsen, Jeanett Friis Rohde, Jane Nautrup Østergaard and Berit Lilienthal Heitmann
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14158; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114158 - 29 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1478
Abstract
Background: Kindergartens can potentially contribute substantially to the daily level of physical activity and development of motor skills and might be an ideal setting for improving these as a public health initiative. We aimed to examine whether children from rural outdoor kindergartens had [...] Read more.
Background: Kindergartens can potentially contribute substantially to the daily level of physical activity and development of motor skills and might be an ideal setting for improving these as a public health initiative. We aimed to examine whether children from rural outdoor kindergartens had a lower risk of motor difficulties than children from urban conventional kindergartens. Methods: Motor test results were measured during the first school year by school health nurses using a six-item test of gross- and fine motor skills (jumping, handle a writing tool, cutting with a scissor following a line, one-leg stand on each leg, throwing and grabbing). Register-based information was available on potential confounding factors. Results: We included 901 children from outdoor kindergartens and 993 from conventional kindergartens with a mean (SD) age of 6.5 years (0.4). The children from the two types of kindergarten differed according to demographic information, with outdoor kindergarten children more often being from more affluent families (long maternal education level: 47.5% vs. 31.0%, p < 0.0001) and fewer girls attending the outdoor kindergartens (42.7% vs. 49.5%, p = 0.003). In the adjusted models, we found no evidence of differences in the risk of motor difficulties between children attending either type of kindergarten (OR: 0.95, 95%CI: 0.71; 1.27, p = 0.72). Conclusion: Our results do not support outdoor kindergartens as a potential intervention to improve motor abilities among children. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. Full article
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13 pages, 1258 KiB  
Article
Association between Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Previous Proton Pump Inhibitor Use: A Nested Case–Control Study Using a National Health Screening Cohort
by So Young Kim, Dae Myoung Yoo, Mi Jung Kwon, Ji Hee Kim, Joo-Hee Kim, Joong Seob Lee and Hyo Geun Choi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 10280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610280 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1804
Abstract
The present nested case–control study evaluated the impact of previous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescription on the risk of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A ≥40-year-old Korean population was included. A total of 34,441 patients with BPPV was matched with 137,764 comparison participants [...] Read more.
The present nested case–control study evaluated the impact of previous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescription on the risk of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A ≥40-year-old Korean population was included. A total of 34,441 patients with BPPV was matched with 137,764 comparison participants for demographic and socioeconomic factors. Previous histories of PPI use and PPI prescription dates were compared between the BPPV and comparison groups. The odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of PPI use for BPPV were calculated using a logistic regression. The demographic and socioeconomic factors and comorbidities were adjusted in the adjusted model. Both current and past PPI users were associated with higher odds for BPPV than non-PPI users (adjusted OR (aOR) = 3.57, 95% CI = 3.33–3.83, and p < 0.001 for current PPI users and aOR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.64–1.89, and p < 0.001 for past PPI users). In addition, longer dates of PPI use were related to higher odds for BPPV (aOR (95% CI) = 1.95 [1.81–2.10] for ≥1 day and <30 days of PPI prescription, <2.88 [2.68–3.10] for ≥30 days and <365 days of PPI prescription, and <3.45 [3.19–3.73] for ≥365 days of PPI prescription). PPI use was linked with an elevated risk of BPPV in the adult population. The odds for BPPV were higher in patients with a longer duration of PPI use. Full article
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10 pages, 909 KiB  
Article
Usefulness of Cochrane Reviews in Clinical Guideline Development—A Survey of 585 Recommendations
by Christoffer Bruun Korfitsen, Marie-Louise Kirkegaard Mikkelsen, Anja Ussing, Karen Christina Walker, Jeanett Friis Rohde, Henning Keinke Andersen, Simon Tarp and Mina Nicole Händel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(2), 685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020685 - 7 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2758
Abstract
The Danish Health Authority develops clinical practice guidelines to support clinical decision-making based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system and prioritizes using Cochrane reviews. The objective of this study was to explore the usefulness of Cochrane reviews as [...] Read more.
The Danish Health Authority develops clinical practice guidelines to support clinical decision-making based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system and prioritizes using Cochrane reviews. The objective of this study was to explore the usefulness of Cochrane reviews as a source of evidence in the development of clinical recommendations. Evidence-based recommendations in guidelines published by the Danish Health Authority between 2014 and 2021 were reviewed. For each recommendation, it was noted if and how Cochrane reviews were utilized. In total, 374 evidence-based recommendations and 211 expert consensus recommendations were published between 2014 and 2021. Of the 374 evidence-based recommendations, 106 included evidence from Cochrane reviews. In 28 recommendations, all critical and important outcomes included evidence from Cochrane reviews. In 36 recommendations, a minimum of all critical outcomes included evidence from Cochrane reviews, but not all important outcomes. In 33 recommendations, some but not all critical outcomes included evidence from Cochrane reviews. Finally, in nine recommendations, some of the important outcomes included evidence from Cochrane reviews. In almost one-third of the evidence-based recommendations, Cochrane reviews were used to inform clinical recommendations. This evaluation should inform future evaluations of Cochrane review uptake in clinical practice guidelines concerning outcomes important for clinical decision-making. Full article
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17 pages, 4667 KiB  
Article
Effect of Family Practice Contract Services on the Perceived Quality of Primary Care among Patients with Multimorbidity: A Cross-Sectional Study in Guangdong, China
by Jingyi Liao, Mengping Zhou, Chenwen Zhong, Cuiying Liang, Nan Hu and Li Kuang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010157 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2871
Abstract
Family practice contract services, an important primary-care reform policy for improving primary healthcare quality in China, incorporate patients with multiple chronic conditions into the priority coverage groups and focus on their management. This study aims to explore the family practice contract services’ effectiveness [...] Read more.
Family practice contract services, an important primary-care reform policy for improving primary healthcare quality in China, incorporate patients with multiple chronic conditions into the priority coverage groups and focus on their management. This study aims to explore the family practice contract services’ effectiveness in improving the quality of primary care experienced by this population. A cross-sectional study using a three-stage sampling was conducted from January to March 2019 in Guangdong, China. A multivariable linear regression, including interaction terms, was applied to examine the associations between the contract services and primary care quality among people with different chronic conditions. The process quality of primary care was measured in six dimensions using the validated assessment survey of primary care (ASPC) scale. People with contract services scored higher in terms of quality of primary care than those without contract services. Contract services moderated the association between chronic condition status and primary care quality. Significantly positive interactions were observed in the patient-centred care dimension and negative interactions were reflected in the accessibility dimension. Our findings suggest that family practice contract services play a crucial role in improving patient-perceived primary care quality and provide emerging evidence that patients with multimorbidity tend to benefit more from the services, especially in patient-centred care. Full article
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