ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Health Education and Promotion of Healthy Lifestyles across the Lifespan

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 10462

Special Issue Editors

EFYPAF “Physical Education and Physical Activity Promotion” Research Group, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 44002 Teruel, Spain
Interests: physical education; teaching; motivation; physical activity; health-related behaviors; scales validation; quantitative methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Educación Física y Deportiva, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
Interests: physical education; teaching; models-based practice; motivation; physical activity; health-related behaviors

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
EFYPAF “Physical Education and Physical Activity Promotion” Research Group, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 22001 Huesca, Spain
Interests: physical education; teaching; models-based practice; motivation; physical activity; health-related behaviors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research examining the physical, social, and cognitive health effects of physical activity, sedentary behaviors, sleep, diet, and substance consumption on different health indicators has largely been conducted independently or in isolation of the other behaviors. Recent research suggests that the combination of behaviors may impact health in a way that cannot be explained by the effect of individual behaviors studied in isolation. It is thus important to examine clusters of behaviors and their interactions for various health outcomes if we want to better tailor the development of effective intervention strategies aimed at improving the health of the population. 

A recent integrative approach suggests that components of the movement continuum (i.e., physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration) are codependent behaviors across the whole day (24-hour period). All three movement behaviors matter for optimal health. Consequently, 24-Hour Movement Guidelines have been published for the early years (0–4 years), children and youth (5–17 years), adults (18–64 years), and older adults (65+ years) in the last 5 years. Although the number of studies is still growing, more worldwide research is needed to determine the adherence to, correlates of, and associations of these 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. Moreover, examining not only the adherence to, correlates of, and associations of these 24-Hour Movement Guidelines but also other health-related behaviors (e.g., healthy diets) and health-risk behaviors (e.g., substance consumption) are required to provide a more fine-grained picture of the importance of healthy lifestyles. Although multiple health behavior change interventions (MHBC; i.e., addressing two or more health behaviors) have also been suggested as a promising approach to obtain additional health benefits, further interventional studies are needed to strengthen the evidence. 

While studies related to health-related behaviors (e.g., physical activity, healthy diet, and sleep) and health-risk behaviors (e.g., unhealthy diet, sedentary behaviors, and substance consumption) are welcome, special consideration will be given to the following research avenues that need further attention in this field: (1) adherence to the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines and other health-related recommendations across the lifespan; (2) the association between these 24-hour movement behaviors and other health-related and health-risk behaviors, and different health indicators; (3) individual, social, environmental, and policy correlates of these 24-Hour Movement Guidelines and other health-related recommendations; (4) longitudinal designs to examine the cause–effect relationships between these 24-hour movement behaviors, and other health-related and health-risk behaviors, and different health indicators; (5) MHBC intervention studies aimed at improving 24-hour movement behaviors, and other health-related and health-risk behaviors, as well as health outcomes; (6) examining the optimal composition of movement behaviors within a 24 h period for improved health; (7) associations between health-related behavior profiles and different health indicators; (8) associations between different health-related and health-risk behaviors; (9) promising strategies for changing 24-hour movement behaviors and other health-related and health-risk behaviors; (10) advances in multiple health behavior change measurement. Studies before and during the COVID-19 pandemic are welcome. 

Dr. Angel Abos
Dr. Javier Sevil-Serrano
Dr. Luis Garcia-Gonzalez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Sleep
  • Diet
  • Sedentary time
  • Screen time
  • Substance consumption
  • 24-hour movement guidelines
  • Movement behaviors
  • Energy-related behaviors
  • Health-risk behaviors
  • Health-related behaviors
  • Gender
  • School-based intervention
  • Healthy lifestyles

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 797 KiB  
Article
Toxic Habits and Well-Being Measures in Spanish Healthcare University Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Irene Zapata, José Luis Maté-Muñoz, Alfonso Higueras, Juan Hernández-Lougedo, Natalia Martín-Fidalgo, Pablo García-Fernández, María Victoria Redondo-Vega and Jaime Ruiz-Tovar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13213; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013213 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1883
Abstract
Background: Unhealthy lifestyles are strongly entrenched in healthcare universities and have sometimes been linked to stress or lack of sleep. This study investigated the prevalence of toxic habits (smoking, patterns of harmful alcohol use, and illicit drug use), stress levels, perceived health status, [...] Read more.
Background: Unhealthy lifestyles are strongly entrenched in healthcare universities and have sometimes been linked to stress or lack of sleep. This study investigated the prevalence of toxic habits (smoking, patterns of harmful alcohol use, and illicit drug use), stress levels, perceived health status, and sleep duration and assessed the connections between toxic habits and said well-being measures, as well as healthcare students’ perception of the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on these health-related behaviors. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, healthcare students from Alfonso X University (Spain) completed a health survey composed of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), self-perceived health status, and the number of hours of sleep. Results: A total of 997 healthcare students completed the survey, of which 982 were analyzed. Being a smoker (32.2%) was associated with worse health status and insufficient sleep. Risk drinkers (33.2%) were associated with being female, and the consumption of cannabinoids (6.7%), with being male. These three toxic habits were related to each other. High levels of stress (28.2%) were correlated with worse ratings in the perception of health status (29.2%) and with insufficient sleep (45.8%), and all of them were associated with the female sex. Respectively, 49.3% and 44.2% of students recognized a worsening in their perception of stress and their sleep habits during the pandemic. Conclusion: Healthcare universities must carry out health promotion programs for stress management, sleep habits, and unhealthy lifestyles. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 354 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Autonomy and Self-Control on Changes in Healthy Lifestyles of Inactive College Students through Regular Exercise
by Jihoon Ahn and Inwoo Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710727 - 28 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1574
Abstract
This study aimed to verify the influence of autonomy and self-control as psychological factors on the changes in lifestyles of inactive college students by participating in regular exercise. A total of 188 university students in Seoul, Korea, taking physical fitness classes for 5 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to verify the influence of autonomy and self-control as psychological factors on the changes in lifestyles of inactive college students by participating in regular exercise. A total of 188 university students in Seoul, Korea, taking physical fitness classes for 5 weeks held three times a week participated in the surveys. Surveys were conducted in the first session (T1) and 15th session (T2) of the classes. Autonomy in exercise participation and self-control were measured at T1, and healthy lifestyle was measured at both T1 and T2. A paired t-test was used to measure the changes in healthy lifestyle between two time points, and hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to determine the effect of autonomy in exercise participation and self-control measured at T1 on the healthy lifestyle score at T2. According to the analysis, participants’ healthy lifestyles were improved with a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-exercise. Furthermore, the levels of autonomy and self-control before the fitness classes positively influenced the participants’ healthy lifestyle after the classes even when the influence of healthy lifestyle measured before the classes was controlled. Thus, it was confirmed that autonomy for participation and self-control are important to change one’s healthy lifestyle through regular exercise participation. Full article
19 pages, 382 KiB  
Article
Shaping Physical Activity through Facilitating Student Agency in Secondary Schools in the Netherlands
by Gwendolijn M. M. Boonekamp, John A. J. Dierx and Erik Jansen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9028; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159028 - 25 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1516
Abstract
Schools can enable students’ capability for lifelong physical activity (PA) by providing a physical, social and pedagogical context fostering students’ agency. This entails allowing them to develop their autonomy and ability to shape PAs according to what they value. This paper explores whether [...] Read more.
Schools can enable students’ capability for lifelong physical activity (PA) by providing a physical, social and pedagogical context fostering students’ agency. This entails allowing them to develop their autonomy and ability to shape PAs according to what they value. This paper explores whether, and, if so, how, school practices provide the conditions for developing and employing PA-related student agency. We followed a multiple case study design, partnering with six secondary schools in the Netherlands. We based our qualitative content analysis on the schools’ policy documents and transcripts of interviews and focus groups with school management, teaching staff and supporting sports professionals. First, we analysed the space provided for PA-related student agency using the whole-of-school framework. Next, we used a social practice theory perspective to understand how each school practice allows for student agency. Results suggest that schools offer sufficient and varied PA opportunities but have not embedded deliberation with students on their meaningfulness and transfer to other contexts in their practices. We conclude that for schools to promote lifelong PA for students, there is a need for a pedagogical approach involving students’ perspectives, participation and reflections, enabling them to transfer PAs to other (future) life settings. Full article
20 pages, 980 KiB  
Article
A Community-Based Participatory Action Research with Women from Disadvantaged Populations: Strengths and Weaknesses of a Multiple Health Behaviour Change Intervention
by María Sanz-Remacha, Alberto Aibar, Ángel Abós, Eduardo Generelo-Lanaspa and Luis García-González
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6830; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116830 - 02 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2362
Abstract
Disadvantaged populations usually adopt risk behaviours, resulting in obesity and mental health-related disorders. Grounded in the socioecological model and self-determination theory, the aims were firstly to describe and implement a two-year multiple health behaviour change intervention, and secondly, to assess the strengths and [...] Read more.
Disadvantaged populations usually adopt risk behaviours, resulting in obesity and mental health-related disorders. Grounded in the socioecological model and self-determination theory, the aims were firstly to describe and implement a two-year multiple health behaviour change intervention, and secondly, to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the intervention. In total, 11 women from a disadvantaged population participated in this programme, which encompassed 117 sessions. Qualitative techniques were used to collect data and a thematic analysis was conducted. The variety of activities and the group-based intervention were the main strengths, and the decrease in attendance and the programme’s tight schedule were the main weaknesses. This is the first intervention in a disadvantaged population mainly comprised of Roma women. The design described in detail and its assessment provide relevant knowledge to improve their health status and decrease inequalities. The practical implications for future research are useful for replicating interventions in similar contexts. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Modeling the Development of Local Health-Enhancing Physical Activity Policies from Empirical Data and Policy Science Theories
by Antoine Noël Racine, Jean-Marie Garbarino, Bernard Massiera and Anne Vuillemin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1213; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031213 - 22 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2119
Abstract
Physical inactivity is considered a pandemic, requiring strong policy responses to address this major health issue. However, research on the development of Health-Enhancing Physical Activity policies (HEPA) remains scarce, particularly at the local level. There is a need to produce evidence to better [...] Read more.
Physical inactivity is considered a pandemic, requiring strong policy responses to address this major health issue. However, research on the development of Health-Enhancing Physical Activity policies (HEPA) remains scarce, particularly at the local level. There is a need to produce evidence to better understand the process to develop local HEPA policies. This study aims to model the development of HEPA policy promotion in French municipalities from empirical data and policy science theories. This research was undertaken in three steps: (1) assess the level of development of HEPA policies from 10 French municipalities using a local HEPA analysis tool, (2) provide a brief overview of core political science theories applied in health promotion, and (3) from these empirical and theoretical perspectives, model a conceptual framework to better understand the development of HEPA policy promotion in French municipalities. Based on empirical data and the Multiple Streams, policy cycles and Institutional Rational Choice theories, a conceptual framework of the development of municipal HEPA policy promotion was modeled. This conceptual framework is comprised of five stages describing the development of municipal HEPA policies. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the development of municipal HEPA policies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop