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Toxicological and Health Effects of Air Pollutants

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Air".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 1956

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
International Center for Ecology, Meteorology, and Environment, School of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
Interests: environmental geochemistry and health; air pollution; atmospheric particulate matters; bioaerosols; emerging contaminants; nano-plastics; heavy metals; toxicology; risk assessments; climate change and health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China
2. Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China
Interests: microplastics; ecotoxicity; microbiota; risk assessment; data mining; toxicity mechanisms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air pollution is one of the major environmental risks to health. Reducing air pollution could help countries decrease the burden of diseases such as stroke, heart disease, lung cancer and chronic and acute respiratory diseases, including asthma.

However, the decrease in the concentration of air pollutants (including CO, NOx, PMs, SO2, O3, VOCs, heavy metals, microplastics, EPFRs, bioaerosol, etc.) does not mean the same reduction in health effects, as the difference in components determines the difference in health risks. The method and mechanism of the combined toxicity of multiple complex components of air pollutants are not currently clear, and there is still an urgent need to establish a full chain of evidence concerning what kind of hazardous effects exposure has on health and the impact of air pollution on the occurrence and development of major diseases. This Special Issue focuses on scientific issues such as the toxicological mechanism and health hazards of air pollutants, the key toxic components, and their sources and exposure routes; individual and population-level exposure assessment methods, etc.

Prof. Dr. Xiao-San Luo
Prof. Dr. Qiansheng Huang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air pollution
  • particulate matters
  • ozone
  • heavy metals
  • microplastics (MPs)
  • environmental persistent free radicals (EPFRs)
  • bioaerosol
  • toxicology
  • human health risks

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2411 KiB  
Article
Inhalation Bioaccessibility and Risk Assessment of Metals in PM2.5 Based on a Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry Model in the Smelting District of Northeast China
by Siyu Sun, Na Zheng, Sujing Wang, Yunyang Li, Shengnan Hou, Qirui An, Changcheng Chen, Xiaoqian Li, Yining Ji and Pengyang Li
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 8915; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19158915 - 22 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1514
Abstract
PM2.5 can deposit and partially dissolve in the pulmonary region. In order to be consistent with the reality of the pulmonary region and avoid overestimating the inhalation human health risk, the bioaccessibility of PM2.5 heavy metals and the deposition fraction (DF) [...] Read more.
PM2.5 can deposit and partially dissolve in the pulmonary region. In order to be consistent with the reality of the pulmonary region and avoid overestimating the inhalation human health risk, the bioaccessibility of PM2.5 heavy metals and the deposition fraction (DF) urgently needs to be considered. This paper simulates the bioaccessibility of PM2.5 heavy metals in acidic intracellular and neutral extracellular deposition environments by simulating lung fluid. The multipath particle dosimetry model was used to simulate DF of PM2.5. According to the exposure assessment method of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the inhalation exposure dose threshold was calculated, and the human health risk with different inhalation exposure doses was compared. The bioaccessibility of heavy metals is 12.1–36.2%. The total DF of PM2.5 in adults was higher than that in children, and children were higher than adults in the pulmonary region, and gradually decreased with age. The inhalation exposure dose threshold is 0.04–14.2 mg·kg−1·day−1 for the non-carcinogenic exposure dose and 0.007–0.043 mg·kg−1·day−1 for the carcinogenic exposure dose. Cd and Pb in PM2.5 in the study area have a non-carcinogenic risk to human health (hazard index < 1), and Cd has no or a potential carcinogenic risk to human health. A revised inhalation health risk assessment may avoid overestimation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicological and Health Effects of Air Pollutants)
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