Special Issue "Rural and Remote Health Workforce"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kathleen Tori
Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing, College of Health and Medicine, Newnham campus, University of Tasmania, Launceston 7250, Australia
Interests: advanced practice nursing; higher education; impact evaluation; multidisciplinary; nurse practitioners; nurse led models of care; policy; professionalism; rural and remote nursing; research translation; sustainability
Dr. Carey Mather
Website
Guest Editor
Affiliation: School of Nursing, College of Health and Medicine, Newnham Campus, University of Tasmania, Launceston 7250, Australia
Interests: evaluation; digital professionalism; health literacy; higher education; human computer interaction; nursing; mobile learning; mobile technology; nursing informatics; participatory health; primary health; social media
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rural and remote areas experience unique challenges, and as such, healthcare services require strategic planning or redesign in order to be responsive and sustainable. Documented poorer health outcomes for rural communities are compounded by chronicity of disease; ageing populations; lack of sustainable infrastructure; the tyranny of distance to definitive, specialised health care; and workforce issues related to the recruitment and retention of health practitioners. The delivery of various healthcare systems approaches, including tertiary and targeted primary care models, to meet the evolving needs of the rural communities should be a priority. In recent years, many alternate models of healthcare delivery have been proposed, trialed and evaluated; however, many have had limited success from a sustainability perspective.

This Special Issue of IJERPH provides an opportunity to explore the reality of healthcare options and outcomes for rural and remote communities. Papers that explore successful integration of innovative healthcare models demonstrating improved accessibility and health outcomes are encouraged, as are papers that focus on plausible solutions to the identified health workforce issues in these communities. Research from all healthcare disciplines and settings addressing impact and economic evaluations of rural and remote health initiatives are welcome.

Dr. Kathleen Tori
Dr. Carey Mather
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Rural and remote
  • Health
  • Workforce
  • Recruitment and retention
  • Multidisciplinary
  • Models of practice
  • Access
  • Equity
  • Sustainability
  • Primary care
  • Care systems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Increasing Rural Recruitment and Retention through Rural Exposure during Undergraduate Training: An Integrative Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6423; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176423 - 03 Sep 2020
Abstract
Objectives: Ensuring nationwide access to medical care challenges health systems worldwide. Rural exposure during undergraduate medical training is promising as a means for overcoming the shortage of physicians outside urban areas, but the effectiveness is widely unknown. This integrative review assesses the effects [...] Read more.
Objectives: Ensuring nationwide access to medical care challenges health systems worldwide. Rural exposure during undergraduate medical training is promising as a means for overcoming the shortage of physicians outside urban areas, but the effectiveness is widely unknown. This integrative review assesses the effects of rural placements during undergraduate medical training on graduates’ likelihood to take up rural practice. Methods: The paper presents the results of a longitudinal review of the literature published in PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar and elsewhere on the measurable effects of rural placements and internships during medical training on the number of graduates in rural practice. Results: The combined database and hand search identified 38 suitable primary studies with rather heterogeneous interventions, endpoints and results, mostly cross-sectional and control studies. The analysis of the existing evidence exhibited predominantly positive but rather weak correlations between rural placements during undergraduate medical training and later rural practice. Beyond the initial scope, the review underpinned rural upbringing to be the strongest predictor for rural practice. Conclusions: This review confirms that rural exposure during undergraduate medical training to contributes to recruitment and retention in nonurban settings. It can play a role within a broader strategy for overcoming the shortage of rural practitioners. Rural placements during medical education turned out to be particularly effective for rural-entry students. Given the increasing funding being directed towards medical schools to produce graduates that will work rurally, more robust high-quality research is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rural and Remote Health Workforce)
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