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Dental Health in Children and Adolescents

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 7214

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Pediatric Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC), 08195 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: dental caries; oral public health; minimal intervention dentistry; silver diamine fluoride; special needs patients; behavioural management; caries remineralization; MIH; dental education; sports dentistry

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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain
Interests: dental caries; oral public health; minimal intervention dentistry; silver diamine fluoride; special needs patients; behavioural management; caries remineralization; MIH; dental education

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain
Interests: dental caries; oral public health; minimal intervention dentistry; silver diamine fluoride; special needs patients; behavioural management; caries remineralization; MIH; dental education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is an honor to present this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health entitled “Dental Health in Children and Adolescents”, as guest editor and co-guest editors.

Dental health is part of the general health of all individuals and should be accessible to everyone, regardless of age, ethnicity, sex or economic status, as it is essential for a good quality of life. Among the pathologies found in the oral cavity, dental caries is the most prevalent, chronic, non-communicable disease worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) indicates that 60-90% of children are affected by dental caries, being one of the main causes of premature tooth loss in children, which can cause damage to the primary dentition and future permanent dentition.

Caries is defined as a sugar-dependent disease. In addition, other factors are involved in the development of new caries lesions and the progression of existing ones, such as the susceptibility of the host, dental hygiene, frequency of dental check-ups and behavioral, social and/or cultural factors. It represents a public health problem and affects the quality of life of children, potentially causing problems in development, growth and learning.

In this Special Issue, original papers from various subjects (caries in children, behavioral management, MIH) that employ various research methods (retrospective studies, prospective longitudinal studies, randomized controlled trials, systematic and narrative reviews, meta-analyses, clinical cases) focused on childhood caries prevention and management will be accepted.

Dr. Francisco Guinot Jimeno
Dr. Monica Miegimolle Herrero
Dr. Alberto Adanero Velasco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental caries
  • caries and dietary habits
  • primary health care
  • gingival diseases
  • deep caries lesion
  • oral public health
  • dental materials
  • minimal intervention dentistry
  • silver diamine fluoride
  • special needs children
  • behavioral management
  • caries remineralization
  • MIH
  • biomaterials
  • dental education

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 599 KiB  
Article
A Cross-Sectional Study of Oral Health Status and Behavioral Risk Indicators among Non-Smoking and Currently Smoking Lithuanian Adolescents
by Sandra Petrauskienė, Miglė Žemaitienė, Eglė Aida Bendoraitienė, Kristina Saldūnaitė-Mikučionienė, Ingrida Vasiliauskienė, Jūratė Zūbienė, Vilija Andruškevičienė and Eglė Slabšinskienė
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(16), 6609; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20166609 - 19 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1454
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate oral health status, behavioral risk indicators, and the impact of smoking on oral health among Lithuanian adolescents. This representative cross-sectional study was conducted among 15-year-old Lithuanian adolescents. The method of multistage cluster sampling was used. [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate oral health status, behavioral risk indicators, and the impact of smoking on oral health among Lithuanian adolescents. This representative cross-sectional study was conducted among 15-year-old Lithuanian adolescents. The method of multistage cluster sampling was used. A total of 1127 adolescents met the inclusion criteria. Two originally created self-reported questionnaires were used in this study. Dental caries, periodontal status, and oral hygiene status were evaluated by four trained researchers. A p-value ≤ 0.05 was set to indicate statistically significant differences. Statistical analysis included Mann–Whitney, Kruskal–Wallis, and Spearman correlation tests. Out of all the participants, 9.6% self-reported being a current tobacco smoker. The mean PI value was 1.14 ± 0.69 among all the participants. Currently smoking adolescents had more active caries lesions (D-S) than those who did not smoke (13.2 ± 16.4 vs. 9.8 ± 10.7, p = 0.023). Considering periodontal status, non-smoking adolescents had significantly lower mean PSR index scores than current smokers (0.52 ± 0.51 vs. 0.61 ± 0.50, p = 0.0298). Tobacco smoking and the consumption of energy drinks were significantly associated (OR = 3.74, 95% CI 2.66–5.26, p < 0.001) among participants. Currently smoking adolescents tended to have improper dietary habits, especially a higher consumption of energy drinks; thus, they were more likely to have active dental caries lesions, as well as poorer periodontal status, than their non-smoking peers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Health in Children and Adolescents)
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15 pages, 360 KiB  
Article
COVID-19 Lockdown: Impact on Oral Health-Related Behaviors and Practices of Portuguese and Spanish Children
by Ana L. Costa, Joana L. Pereira, Lara Franco and Francisco Guinot
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16004; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316004 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1598
Abstract
This study aimed to assess and compare the impact of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on the oral health attitudes, dietary habits and access to dental care of Portuguese and Spanish children. A cross-sectional observational study involving caregivers of 3–17-year-old children who had cohabited during [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess and compare the impact of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on the oral health attitudes, dietary habits and access to dental care of Portuguese and Spanish children. A cross-sectional observational study involving caregivers of 3–17-year-old children who had cohabited during a COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Spain and Portugal was conducted. Caregivers completed an online anonymous questionnaire. Aiming groups comparison, chi-square test was used for qualitative variables. 770 surveys were obtained. Significant changes in the children’s routine were higher in Portugal (p < 0.001). Both countries showed a large percentage of children who had between 2–3 snacks between meals (p < 0.001) and a higher consumption of snacks was particularly noticed among Spanish children with untreated dental caries during the lockdown (p = 0.003). Most caregivers reported children’s oral hygiene habits did not suffer noteworthy alterations (p = 0.417), although parental supervision of toothbrushing was associated with dental attendance during the lockdown. The majority of the sample had no dental attendance during confinement. Confinement appears to have not markedly affected the oral health status and habits of the majority of these children, although an important impact of some demographic and behavioral factors upon dietary and oral care/habits was detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Health in Children and Adolescents)

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9 pages, 617 KiB  
Brief Report
Screening for Selenomonas noxia in a Pediatric and Adolescent Patient Population Reveals Differential Oral Prevalence across Age Groups
by Katelyn Hendricks, Tyler Hatch, Karl Kingsley and Katherine M. Howard
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(4), 391; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21040391 - 23 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
Selenomonas noxia, a gram-negative anaerobe usually present in periodontitis, may be linked to overweight and obese adults. Recent advancements include a valid qPCR screening, enabling an effective prevalence study among pediatric patients aged 7 to 17 years. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Selenomonas noxia, a gram-negative anaerobe usually present in periodontitis, may be linked to overweight and obese adults. Recent advancements include a valid qPCR screening, enabling an effective prevalence study among pediatric patients aged 7 to 17 years. The aim of this study was to complete a retrospective screening of saliva samples from an existing biorepository using a validated qPCR screening protocol. The pediatric study sample (n = 87) comprised nearly equal numbers of males and females, mostly minority patients (67%), with an average age of 13.2 years. Screening for Selenomonas noxia revealed 34.4% (n = 30/87) positive samples, evenly distributed between males and females (p = 0.5478). However, an age-dependent association was observed with higher percentages of positive samples observed with higher ages (13.3% among 7 to 10 years; 34.6% among 11 to 13 years; 54.8% among 14–17 years), which was statistically significant (p = 0.0001). Although these findings revealed no noteworthy distinctions between males or females and minorities and non-minorities, the notable contrast between younger (7 to 10 years) and older (11 to 17 years) participants, possibly influenced by factors such as hormones and behavioral traits, will require further investigation of this patient population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Health in Children and Adolescents)
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10 pages, 1508 KiB  
Systematic Review
Management of Hypoplastic or Hypomineralized Defects with Resin Infiltration at Pediatric Ages: Systematic Review
by María Dolores Casaña-Ruiz, Laura Marqués Martínez and Esther García Miralles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 5201; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20065201 - 15 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1877
Abstract
Hypoplastic or hypomineralized enamel defects represent a recurrent reason for consultation within the pediatric population, causing great discomfort due to their aesthetic appearance, as well as their functional limitations. Current conservative dentistry requires minimally invasive treatments in order to treat such defects and [...] Read more.
Hypoplastic or hypomineralized enamel defects represent a recurrent reason for consultation within the pediatric population, causing great discomfort due to their aesthetic appearance, as well as their functional limitations. Current conservative dentistry requires minimally invasive treatments in order to treat such defects and provide successful, definitive solutions. A systematic review of the literature has been carried out in accordance with the PRISMA recommendations. A search was carried out in the PubMed, Scopus, SciELO and Web of Science databases, completed with a manual search. The following variables were extracted from the selected studies: author, year, publication journal, type of study, sample, age of the participants and the materials used for its development. From the initial electronic search of the four databases, 282 articles were identified: 34 from PubMed, 240 from Scopus, 0 from SciELO and 8 from Web of Science. After eliminating duplicate articles, a total of 225 remained. After reading the title and abstract, 158 articles were eliminated, leaving 68. Upon reading the full text, the remaining studies were eliminated for not answering the research question or the inclusion criteria, leaving a total of 13 articles. Finally, 12 articles were used to carry out the systematic review. Treatments performed to date with the ICON™ system in pediatric patients have shown good results after their application. Since the variability of diagnostic methods has been observed, new diagnostic and assessment protocols should be created after treatment to objectify their effect on hypoplastic or hypomineralized enamel defects. In the same way, it has been described that treatment provides better results if combined with other opalustre-type or remineralizing materials. This review is registered in PROSPERO with the number CRD42021288738. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Health in Children and Adolescents)
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